Butter Rum Pound Cake

Welcome to Day Two of the Twelve Days of Pound Cake Holiday Event!

Today’s cake is a childhood favorite of mine.

I grew up in the 80’s, Family. The rules were a bit different.

ANYWAY

Every year, a couple of weeks before Christmas, a package would arrive at my house. You could smell it before you opened it and it always put my father right into the Christmas spirit.

In that box, under a layer or three of heavy duty tin foil and a double wrapping of Saran Wrap, was my aunt’s rum cake. The rum cake. The one that was supposed to be strictly forbidden for anyone who was less than double the drinking age. The cake that had essentially cured and preserved in rum for the two weeks before it even hit the First Class U.S. Postal Mail.

That rum cake. It was squishy and rummy and spicy and its arrival was always the unofficial start of the holidays. Thinking about that rum cake will forever make me nostalgic for those bitter cold Midwestern holiday seasons of my youth.

So, of course I had to add a rum cake to the lineup.

About this Butter Rum Pound Cake

This recipe, as written, isn’t nearly as rummy as my aunt’s recipe, though you can definitely increase or decrease the rum to your liking. There are instructions in the recipe that should get you to the ::chef’s kiss:: rum flavor of your choice.

Within reason, folks. You can increase the rum within reason.

This recipe, as written, has an unbelievably amazing rum flavor, which is balanced extremely well with a luscious butteriness that you have to experience to understand in order to believe. While the cake batter is, of course, the leading lady in this cake, the butter rum simple syrup is a proverbial force to be reckoned with as a costar. And the glaze? THE GLAZE?

If rum cake is a must-have for you during the holidays, then this rum cake recipe is perfect for you.

Beginners Start Here

If you’re new to baking, or if your stand mixer is covered in dust, here are a couple of articles from the BwB site that will help you get off to a great start with this recipe!

These resources are never mandatory reading, but they are super useful to help you understand the techniques that you’ll need to successfully execute this amazing cake. Happy Reading!

Important Tools Used in this Recipe:

There are some products that I use and love on a regular basis. They’re especially useful for the pound cakes that are featured in this event. **I get paid a small commission if you purchase directly from some of these links, but they are truly amazing products that you’ll find in my home kitchen.**

If you have them already, great! Think of this as a checklist to help you build the confidence that you’ll need to execute this recipe!

And now…the Butter Rum Pound Cake recipe of your dreams awaits!

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon

Butter Rum Pound Cake


  • Author: Shani

Description

This beautifully rummy cake always reminds me of the start of the holiday season.  The rum levels can be customized to your taste as well, though as written, the balance between butter and rum is perfection!


Ingredients

Units Scale

For the Cake Batter:

  • 384 g flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 345 g butter
  • 250 g granulated sugar
  • 250 g brown sugar
  • 5 eggs
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1 tsp rum extract (optional)
  • 125 g buttermilk
  • 125 g rum

For the Butter Rum Simple Syrup:

  • 84 g water
  • 67 g granulated sugar
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 12 tbsp rum
  • 2 tsp butter

For the Final Glaze:

  • 240 g confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/8 tsp salt
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 12 tbsp rum
  • 13 tbsp heavy cream or whole milk

Instructions

To Make the Batter in a Stand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  It is highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for this recipe, since proper oven temperature can impact the finished product.
  2. Combine the buttermilk and rum in a two-cup liquid measuring cup.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking soda and salt (if using kosher salt, omit it from this step).
  4. Sift the flour/baking soda mixture into a large bowl.  If using kosher salt, add it at this time.
  5. Place the room temperature butter in the bowl of your stand mixer.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (30 seconds)
  6. Slowly add the granulated sugar and brown sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (7-10 minutes)
  7. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and fifth egg).  This step is extremely important because eggs help with cake rise!  (6 minutes)
  8. Add vanilla extract and rum extract (if using) and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  9. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined. (30-45 seconds)
  10. Add all of the buttermilk/rum mixture and mix on low speed until well combined.  (~1 minute)
  11. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until almost combined.  Stop mixing just before the mixture is fully together. (1-2 minutes)
  12. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Keep mixing until the batter is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to get the entire bottom of the bowl!
  13. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with butter and flour and place the batter in the pan.

To Make the Batter with a Hand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  It is highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for this recipe, since proper oven temperature can impact the finished product.
  2. Combine the buttermilk and rum in a two-cup liquid measuring cup.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking soda and salt (if using kosher salt, omit it from this step).
  4. Sift the flour/baking soda mixture into a large bowl.  If using kosher salt, add it at this time.
  5. Place the room temperature butter in the a large mixing bowl.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (~1 minute)
  6. Add half of the sugar and mix until the sugar is incorporated.  (~30 seconds)
  7. Add the second half of the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (9-12 minutes)
  8. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 1 minute after each addition.  Scrape the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and fifth egg).  This step is extremely important because eggs help with cake rise!  (7 minutes)
  9. Add vanilla extract and rum extract (if using) and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  10. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined. (~1 minute)
  11. Add all of the buttermilk/rum mixture and mix on low speed until well combined.  (~1 minute)
  12. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until almost combined.  Stop mixing just before the mixture is fully together. (1-2 minutes)
  13. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Keep mixing until the batter is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to get the entire bottom of the bowl!
  14. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with butter and flour and place the batter in the pan.

To Bake the Cake:

  1. Bake the cake at a true 325°F for 60-75 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer reads 210°F-215°F.  My preferred internal temperature is 212°F on the nose.  Alternately, the cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with just a few crumbs.
  2. Allow the cake to rest for ten minutes while you make the simple syrup.

To Make the Butter Rum Simple Syrup:

  1. Combine water, sugar, vanilla and salt in a small sauce pan.
  2. Bring the mixture to a boil, then whisk occasionally until the sugar is completely dissolved.
  3. Remove from the heat and add rum and butter.   Stir gently until the butter is completely melted.  This recipe makes enough butter rum simple syrup to brush the cake one time.
  4. After allowing the cake to rest for ten minutes, invert it on a cooling rack and carefully remove the bundt pan.
  5. Using a pastry brush, gently brush the butter rum simple syrup over the entire cake.  This step can be repeated multiple times while the cake is warm.  It’s recommended to wait about ten minutes between simple syrup layers.
  6. If you’re trying to make a more boozy rum cake, you can poke holes in the top of the cake and pour the butter rum simple syrup directly over the holes.  I would only recommend doing this once though.
  7. Allow the cake to cool completely. (3-5 hours)

To Make the Final Glaze:

  1. Combine confectioner’s sugar, salt, vanilla, 2 tablespoons of heavy cream or whole milk, and 1 tablespoon of rum in a medium sized bowl.
  2. Combine the mixture with a whisk until completely smooth.
  3. Final glaze should have the consistency of thick honey; add rum or heavy cream, one teaspoon at a time, if the original glaze is too thick.
  4. Using a spouted measuring cup, spoon, or squeeze bottle, pour final glaze over the cake.  If necessary, use a spoon to help the glaze fall over the sides of the cake.

Notes

  • I always place a sheet pan underneath my bundt pan.  It gives me extra comfort to know that there’s something there in case of a slight overspill.  Proper measuring will help you avoid this mishap as well!
  • I can’t say this enough, but please, please please take your time creaming the butter and sugar.  Pound cakes don’t use a lot of leavening, which means they are very dependent on proper creaming technique.  The article about creaming butter and sugar will help you with this daunting step!

This rum cake really took me home, Family. It was a delight to develop this beautiful cake for you all. I hope you make lots of memories as you make and eat this cake this holiday season.

See you on Day Three!


While you’re here, don’t forget to subscribe so that you can be the first to know all of the BwB Happenings!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Have you checked us out on Instagram?

The Ultimate Chocolate Pound Cake

Friends. Today is the day and you are in the right place.

Today is the inaugural day of the Begin with Butter Twelve Days of Pound Cake Holiday Event!

And we’re coming in hot with the most decadent, amazing chocolate pound cake you’ll ever make.

This cake is for the people who can’t get enough chocolate. But it’s perfectly balanced, with lovely vanilla notes and the signature pound cake texture that I want in my cakes.

This cake is as beautiful as it is delicious, and it’s a guaranteed crowd pleaser that will satisfy even the most picky chocolate lover.

Beginners Start Here:

This cake is a showstopper, but I firmly believe that anyone can do it! If you’re new to baking, or if it’s been a while since you’ve started your ovens, check out these resources from the BwB site before you get started! These resources will help ease any fears that you have about tackling this stunner.

While these aren’t mandatory reading, they will be super helpful for you on your pound cake journey!

Important Tools Used in this Recipe:

These are affiliate links to the products that I actually use and love!

Onto the recipe!

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon

The Ultimate Chocolate Pound Cake


  • Author: Shani
  • Prep Time: 40 minutes (active)
  • Cook Time: 55-75 minutes
  • Total Time: ~5-7 hours
  • Yield: 14 servings 1x

Description

This decadent chocolate pound cake is stunningly beautiful and insanely rich.  This recipe is easily customizable; you can add all of the extras or omit them and finish with powdered sugar.  Your friends and family will fall in love with this super rich pound cake and you’ll want to make it over and over again.


Ingredients

Units Scale

For the Batter:

  • 288 g all purpose flour
  • 63 g Dutch-process cocoa powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 340 g butter
  • 500 g granulated sugar
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 250 g buttermilk

For the Chocolate Simple Syrup:

  • 83 g water
  • 67 g granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp cocoa powder (I use Dutch process, but you can use whatever you like)
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 1/2 tsp salt

For the Chocolate Ganache:

  • 170 g semi-sweet chocolate chips
  • 125 g heavy cream, well shaken

For the Chocolate Curls:

  • 85 g semisweet chocolate chips
  • 13 g vegetable shortening

Instructions

To Make the Batter in a Stand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  It is highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for this recipe, since proper oven temperature can impact the finished product.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, Dutch-process cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt (if using kosher salt, omit it from this step).
  3. Sift the flour/cocoa powder/baking powder mixture into a large bowl.  If using kosher salt, add it at this time.
  4. Place the room temperature butter in the bowl of your stand mixer.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (30 seconds)
  5. Slowly add the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (5-10 minutes)
  6. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  This step is extremely important!  (7 minutes)
  7. Add vanilla extract and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  8. Add half of the flour/cocoa powder mixture and mix on low speed until combined. (30-45 seconds)
  9. Add all of the buttermilk and mix on low speed until well combined.  (~1 minute)
  10. Add the second half of the flour/cocoa powder mixture and mix on low speed until almost combined.  Stop mixing just before the mixture is fully together. (1-2 minutes)
  11. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Keep mixing until the batter is smooth and consistent.
  12. Grease a bundt pan with butter and cocoa powder and place the batter in a 10-12 cup bundt pan.

To Make the Batter with a Hand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  It is highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for this recipe, since proper oven temperature can impact the finished product.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, Dutch-process cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt (if using kosher salt, omit it from this step).
  3. Sift the flour/cocoa powder/baking powder mixture into a large bowl.  If using kosher salt, add it at this time.
  4. Place the room temperature in a large mixing bowl.  Mix on low speed with a hand mixer until smooth.  (1 minute)
  5. Add half of the sugar and mix until the sugar is incorporated.  (30 seconds)
  6. Add the second half of the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (8-12 minutes)
  7. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least a minute after each addition.  Scrape the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  Don’t skimp on this step! (7 minutes)
  8. Add vanilla extract and mix until thoroughly combined. (1 minute)
  9. Add half of the flour/cocoa powder mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (~1 minute)
  10. Add all of the buttermilk at one time and mix on low speed until completely combined.  (~1 minute)
  11. Add the second half of the flour/cocoa powder and mix on low speed until almost combined.  Stop mixing just before the mixture is fully together.  (~1-2 minutes)
  12. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and (especially!) the bottom of the bowl and then mix gently until the batter is smooth and consistent.  (1-2 minutes).
  13. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with butter and cocoa powder and place the batter in the pan.

To Bake the Cake:

  1. Bake the bundt cake at a true 325°F for 60-70 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer reads 210°F-215°F.  My preferred internal temperature is 212°F on the nose.  Alternately, the cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with just a few crumbs.
  2. Allow the cake to rest for ten minutes while you make the simple syrup.

To Make the Simple Syrup:

  1. Combine sugar, water, cocoa powder, vanilla, and salt in a small sauce pan.
  2. Warm the mixture over medium heat, whisking constantly, until the mixture comes to a boil and the sugar and cocoa powder are completely dissolved.
  3. Remove from the heat.
  4. After allowing the cake to rest for ten minutes, invert it on a cooling rack and carefully remove the bundt pan.
  5. Using a pastry brush, gently brush the chocolate simple syrup over the entire cake.
  6. Allow the cake to cool completely. (3-5 hours)

To Make the Chocolate Ganache:

  1. Place the heavy cream in a microwave safe container.  Warm for about one minute, or until the heavy cream reaches about 195°F.
  2. Place the chocolate chips in a heatproof bowl and pour the heavy cream over the top of the chocolate chips.  Cover with plastic wrap and allow to sit for 5-7 minutes.
  3. Remove the plastic wrap and gently stir the mixture until it is dark in color and has the consistency of thick honey.
  4. Allow the ganache to rest for 5-10 minutes before using.
  5. For best results, use a squeeze bottle to apply the chocolate ganache to the cooled cake.

To Make the Chocolate Curls:

  1. Combine the chocolate chips and vegetable shortening in a microwave safe bowl.
  2. Microwave on high for 30-second intervals until the shortening and chocolate are soft.  Stir together until completely combined.
  3. Using an offset spatula, spread the mixtures on the bottom of a clean sheet pan.  Place the sheet pan in the freezer for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Remove the sheet pan from the freezer.  Using the blade of a stiff spatula at a 45° angle, push the chocolate away from you.  If the chocolate is the proper temp, it will curl.  If it is too cold, it will break.
  5. Add the curls to the cake as you see fit.

To Store:

This cake can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week.  It needs to be refrigerated because of the chocolate ganache and chocolate curls.  If you omit the ganache and the chocolate curls, the cake can be stored on the countertop for 5-6 days.

Notes

  • Proper butter and sugar creaming is essential to success in this cake.  This is the most time-consuming part of the mixing process, so be sure to take your time with this step!
  • You should always place a sheet pan underneath the bundt pan when baking.  This cake is a high riser and the sheet pan gives insurance in the event of a slight overspill.
  • This recipe can be halved in a 5-cup bundt pan or a 5″x9″ loaf pan.
  • Category: Dessert
  • Cuisine: American

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 slice
  • Calories: 591
  • Sugar: 52.3 g
  • Sodium: 305.8 mg
  • Fat: 32.5 g
  • Carbohydrates: 72.3 g
  • Protein: 8 g
  • Cholesterol: 144 mg

Keywords: Pound Cake, Chocolate Cake

To say that I am excited about the next twelve days of recipes would be an understatement. I really hope that you love all of the recipes that are coming your way! If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to ask!

Happy baking!


Are you subscribed so that you can get regular BwB updates? If not, you can sign up right here! When you sign up, you’ll get our FREE Buying Guide for Beginning Bakers. This is the BwB guide that will help you make sure you have all of the necessary equipment to get started as a baker!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Ruby Red Velvet Pound Cake

Friends, Ms. Ruby is here.

Ms. Ruby caused a stir on the Begin with Butter page when I posted her on Instagram, and so many of you asked for the recipe immediately that I moved her up in the recipe rotation. So she is here.

Early. 😊

I am so proud of this cake that I could literally burst.

Ms. Ruby’s Beginnings

Family, I live in Maryland, which is arguably the epicenter of all red velvet cake activity. Even as I was learning how to bake, one of the most requested item from friends and family was red velvet. Cupcakes. Layer cake. Cheesecake (who knew this was a thing?!). Red velvet marble cake. Red velvet ice cream cake.

You get the point. People here are very serious about red velvet.

I’m an equal opportunity cake eater, so red velvet is among the cakes that I like-a-whole-lot. But I can definitely appreciate the way that people love their red velvet cake. They go way out of their way to find good red velvet. As a baker, I have nothing but respect for red velvet super fans.

When I was developing a red velvet recipe, I knew it had to be unbelievable in order to satisfy discerning red velvet cake fans. So I toiled over this recipe for a while until I was ready to share it with the world.

Red velvet lovers, this one is for you.

Beginners Start Here

If you’re new to baking or you’d like some additional information to refresh your baking, feel free to take a look at these resources on the BwB site! While they’re not mandatory reading, they will be really helpful for you to be successful with this cake!

With just a little prep, you’ll be ready to tackle this recipe head-on. I can’t wait to see your amazing creations! Don’t forget to tag @beginwithbutter on Instagram so that I can shout out your successes!

Oh! There’s Video!

Want to make this alongside me? Check out this tutorial video that I made for Instagram TV!

Without further delay, let me introduce you to the recipe for my Ruby Red Velvet Pound Cake. Enjoy!

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon

Ruby Red Velvet Pound Cake


  • Author: Shani

Description

This show-stopping ruby red cake is the perfect addition to any Sunday dinner or holiday table.  Prepare for oohs and aahs when you unbox it, then perfect silence as this beautifully balanced chocolate cake is enjoyed by your friends and family.


Ingredients

Units Scale

For the Cake Batter:

  • 288 g all purpose flour
  • 75 g natural cocoa powder, plus 2-4 tbsp more for greasing the bundt pan
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 230 g butter, room temperature, plus 2 tbsp more for greasing pan
  • 500 g sugar
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 23 tbsp red food coloring (I prefer 2, but if you want a brighter red, use 3)
  • 2 tsp white vinegar
  • 188 g sour cream

For the Chocolate Simple Syrup:

  • 50 g sugar
  • 63 g water
  • 1 tbsp cocoa powder (I use natural)
  • 1tsp vanilla
  • 1/8 tsp salt

For the Cream Cheese Glaze:

  • 77 g cream cheese, room temperature
  • 120 g confectioner’s sugar
  • 1 tsp pure vanilla extract
  • 2 tbsp whole milk
  • 1 tbsp heavy cream (optional, but makes a thicker glaze)
  • 1/8 tsp fine sea salt

Instructions

To Make the Batter With a Hand Mixer:

  1. Set your oven to 325°F and place the oven rack in the center of your oven.  It’s highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for this recipe, since proper oven temperature can impact the finished product.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, natural cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt (if using kosher salt, omit it from this step).
  3. Sift the flour/cocoa powder mixture into a large bowl.  If using kosher salt, add it at this step.
  4. Place the room temperature butter in a large bowl.  Mix on low speed with a hand mixer until smooth. (1 minute)
  5. Add half the sugar and mix until sugar is incorporated. (30 seconds)
  6. Add second half of the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy. (8-12 minutes)
  7. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least a minute after each addition.  Scrape the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  Don’t skimp on this step! (7 minutes)
  8. Add vanilla, red food coloring, and vinegar and mix on low speed until fully combined.  The mixture will likely look curdled at this point and that is okay! (2 minutes)
  9. Add half of the flour/cocoa powder mixture and mix on low speed until combined. (~1 minute)
  10. Add all of the sour cream and mix on low speed until combined. (~1 minute)
  11. Add the second half of the flour/cocoa powder mixture and mix on low speed until almost combined.  Stop mixing just before the mixture is fully together. (~1-2 minutes)
  12. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl and mix gently until the batter has a silky texture. (1-2 minutes)
  13. Grease a bundt pan with butter and cocoa powder and place the batter in a 10-12 cup bundt pan.

To Make the Batter With a Stand Mixer:

  1. Set your oven to 325°F.  It’s highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for this recipe, since proper oven temperature can impact the finished product.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, natural cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt (if using kosher salt, omit it from this step).
  3. Sift the flour/cocoa powder mixture into a large bowl.  If using kosher salt, add it at this step.
  4. Place the room temperature butter in the bowl of your stand mixer.  Mix on low speed until smooth (30 seconds)
  5. Slowly add the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (5-10 minutes)
  6. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  Don’t skimp on this step! (7 minutes)
  7. Add vanilla, red food coloring, and vinegar and mix on low speed until fully combined  The mixture will likely look curdled at this point and that is okay! (2 minutes)
  8. Add half of the flour/cocoa powder mixture and mix on low speed until combined. (30-45 seconds)
  9. Add all of the sour cream and mix on low speed until combined. (30-45 seconds)
  10. Add the second half of the flour/cocoa powder mixture and mix on low speed until almost combined.  Stop mixing just before the mixture is fully together. (30-45 seconds)
  11. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl and mix gently until the batter has a silky texture. (1-2 minutes)
  12. Thoroughly grease a bundt pan with butter and cocoa powder and place the batter in a 10-12 cup bundt pan.

To Bake the Cake:

  1. Bake the bundt cake at 325°F for 60-70 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer reads 210°F-215°F.  My preferred internal temperature is 212°F.  Alternately, the cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with just a few crumbs.
  2. Allow the cake to rest, for ten minutes while you make the simple syrup.

To Make the Simple Syrup:

  1. Combine sugar, water, cocoa powder, vanilla, and salt in a small sauce pan.
  2. Warm the mixture over medium heat, whisking constantly, until the mixture comes to a boil and the sugar and cocoa powder are completely dissolved.
  3. Remove from the heat.
  4. After allowing it to rest for ten minutes, invert the cake on a cooling rack and carefully remove the bundt pan.
  5. Using a pastry brush, brush the chocolate simple syrup over the entire cake.
  6. Allow the cake to cool completely (2-3 hours).

To Make the Final Glaze:

  1. Combine confectioner’s sugar, cream cheese, whole milk, heavy cream, salt, and vanilla in a medium sized bowl.
  2. Using a whisk or hand mixer (on lowest speed), combine mixture until completely smooth.
  3. Add whole milk, one teaspoon at a time, if the original glaze is too thick.
  4. Final glaze should have the consistency of thick honey.  Overmixing will cause the mixture to have air bubbles, so make sure to mix on the lowest speed if using a hand mixer.
  5. Using a spouted measuring cup, spoon, or squeeze bottle, drizzle final glaze over the cake.  Use a spoon to help the glaze fall over the sides of the cake.

To Store:

This cake can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week.  It needs to be refrigerated because of the cream cheese glaze.  If you omit the final glaze, this cake can be stored on the countertop for 5-6 days.

Notes

  • An oven thermometer is strongly recommended to make sure that your oven reaches the correct temperature.
  • It is also strongly recommended to use a digital food scale to measure ingredients using metric measurement. It will seriously make your baking so much easier!
  • This recipe can be halved for a loaf pan or a 6-cup bundt pan.
  • Make sure you take your time to cream the butter and sugar on the front end!  Once you add your flour mixture, you have to mix gently in order to avoid over-mixing.
  • This is a big bundt cake.  I recommend placing a sheet pan underneath this cake while it bakes for extra insurance.

The Best Tools for Perfect Pound Cakes!

*note: This post contains affiliate links for products that I wholeheartedly endorse.*

Friends, I have been having a BALL with pound cakes recently. So much so that I decided to do the Twelve Days of Pound Cakes Holiday Event. So much so that I’ve been baking and developing new pound cake recipes for that event for you.

Including the Ruby Red Velvet Pound Cake. She is gorgeous and she was going to be featured in that event.

Meet Ruby.

I posted Ruby on Instagram the other day, and the email and DM campaign from the BwB community was swift and immediate. I was utterly shocked at how many of you need this recipe for your Thanksgiving tables. So, due to the response, I will be providing Ruby to you in my next post in a few days.

Yes, that’s right…you’re getting TWO posts this week from Begin with Butter!

I want to make sure that you’re set up properly to make Ruby (and all of the pound cakes that are part of the event), so today’s post is about the prep. There are some tools that I rely on to make consistent, great-tasting pound cakes every time, and I wanted to share those tools in today’s post, so that you’re ready to rock and roll when the recipe drops.

Ready? Me too!

In this Post

You might already have most of these things, but I wanted the list to be comprehensive so that you could confidently go forward, knowing that you have all of the tools that you’ll need for these bundt cakes.

Bundt Pans

In order to get the characteristic shape of a bundt cake, you’ll need a bundt pan. Bundt pans will help you get the beautiful, show-stopping shape that you’re wanting to create. They also have higher sides than your typical cake pan, so you don’t have to worry about the cake batter spilling over the sides (within reason).

I wrote a little more about bundt pans in my post about the best pans for a home baker’s kitchen; you can find the section from that post right here. If you’re reading this and you want to know which bundt pans I’ll be using this holiday, here they are!

Digital Food Scale

I will always always always recommend using a digital food scale and metric measurement when baking. Pound cakes are a game of inches and it’s a disaster waiting to happen if you are heavy handed with ingredients. A food scale helps to avoid the trauma of watching your cake overflow its bundt pan in slow motion.

You can find my favorite food scales here and here.

Apron

Baking is a messy thing. There’s no real way to get around that. Sometimes there are unintended splashes and spills. And I, for one, would rather have those splashes and spills intercepted by a quality apron.

My favorites? My Hedley and Bennett Essential Apron is my clear favorite, but it was an investment. Williams Sonoma Classic Stripe Aprons are AMAZING aprons that are sturdy and beautiful, and affordable. I have them in light colors and they have NO STAINS. That fact is rather remarkable, considering the amount of food coloring and cocoa powder abuse I’ve subjected them to over the years.

Oh! And aprons keep your clothes from getting sloshed with dish water! Because there will always be dish water when you’re done baking.

Totally worth it though!

Sifter

Sifting often isn’t necessary for flour these days.

BUT

If you want to make the Ruby Red Velvet Pound Cake, you’ll need a sifter for the cocoa powder and flour mixture. A sifter will break up clumps of cocoa powder and ensure even distribution of that cocoa powder, flour, and other dry ingredients in your beautiful finished pound cake.

Photo Credit: Amazon

Because Ruby? She’s as beautiful as she is delicious. Inside and out. We don’t want lumps of cocoa powder ruining her smooth finish.

Rubber Spatula

This bundt cake uses (**spoiler alert**) sour cream, so it’s a thicker bundt cake batter than most. For that reason, you’ll want a stiffer rubber spatula for the bowl scraping and especially for the final turns of the completed batter.

My go-to spatula set for several years has been this set from Williams Sonoma. They are sturdy and can work through the stiffest cake and cookie batters. The small ones are great for scraping measuring cups and jars for that last…little…bit.

I’ve recently started using this set from OXO. I absolutely adore the OXO brand and use several of their products. These have become regulars in my baking rotation because they’re perfectly flexible while also being perfectly stiff, and they’ll work great for this cake.

Stand Mixer

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it forever: you do not need a stand mixer to bake amazing things. It’s not a necessity. And if you’ve read my recent post on this exact subject, you know that it’s possible to ruin a beautiful, brand new machine if you’re not yet kitchen-competent.

However, the stand mixer is the undisputed monarch when it comes to efficiency in mixing. This is especially true when it comes to efficiently and quickly creaming butter and sugar. Since this is the most crucial part of the mixing process for pound cake, having the most efficient tool for the job can be a huge bonus.

My kitchen workhorse is my KitchenAid Artisan Stand Mixer. I love this machine. It creams butter and sugar so beautifully. This step is crucial for getting that perfect pound cake density, and the planetary motion in my machine ensures that it’s done evenly, efficiently and quickly.

I love this machine so much so that I’m eyeballing a KitchenAid Professional. But that is still a little way away and it’s certainly not necessary to make any of the pound cakes on my list.

Hand Mixer

A great starter gadget for a new baker is a hand mixer. To be sure, it takes a few more minutes to get that perfectly creamed butter and sugar, but you will get there with enough patience and the result will be just the same. I use my hand mixer for smaller batches, and sometimes when I just feel like doing a lazy bake.

I love love love love my KitchenAid Ultra Power hand mixer. It is an amazing tool for just about every cake I will ever bake.

Mixing Bowl Set

These cakes require quite a bit of prep in their own right! Whether you have a stand mixer or hand mixer, a good mixing bowl set will be really helpful for properly preparing your mise en place. While I did do a whole post on the best bowls for a home baker’s kitchen, to get started, I recommend this set of stainless steel bowls.

Photo Credit: Amazon

They come in different sizes so you can use one for the batter, and smaller bowls to hold your individual ingredients. Because proper prep means being calm and collected in the kitchen. And having multiple bowls will help you prep multiple ingredients for the big bake.

Oven Thermometer

Inaccurate oven temperature is one of the main reasons that baked goods fail. It’s a completely avoidable fate, though.

Seriously. For eight dollars, you can gather a wealth of information about whether your oven runs hot or cold. Because it probably does one or the other.

You can find the one I use here.

Instant Read Thermometer

If you’ve ever read a cake recipe, you’ve probably noticed that they usually tell you that the cake is complete when a toothpick, inserted, comes out clean (or with a few crumbs). While this is a serviceable way to test the doneness of a cake, it’s not the most accurate.

Family. My cakes are involved. They are…a bit of a process. And I want to set you up for success by making sure that you have every tool in my arsenal.

For my cakes, I check doneness with an instant read thermometer. Specifically, I use the Classic Super-Fast Instant Read Thermometer from ThermoWorks. With this tool, I can know with absolute certainty when my cake reaches the magic doneness range (210°F-215°F, though I aim for 212°F on the nose).

Cooling Racks

When your cake comes out of the oven, the general rule is to let it rest for ten minutes and then invert it on a cooling rack.

Like one of these!

When cakes first come out of the oven, they’re still cooking a bit in the blazing hot pan. This is good! It allows the center of the cake to fully set.

It wouldn’t be good to leave the cake in the hot pan for longer than ten minutes after it leaves the oven. This could lead to over baking and dryness. At the ten-minute mark, the bundt pan is not as hot as it was when it first came out of the oven. But it’s still hot enough to overbake your cake.

So, out it goes onto a cooling rack! You can find my absolute favorite cooling rack for bundt cakes here.

Pastry Brush

All of my pound cakes (really, all of my cakes) have a step where you add simple syrup to the warm cake immediately after turning it out of the cake pan. This simple syrup helps to preserve moisture in the cake, and gives pound cakes a gorgeous sheen that makes the cake itself worthy of a special occasion, even without a final glaze.

Some people pour the simple syrup over the top of the cake, but I prefer to use a pastry brush for the task. Using a pastry brush ensures an even distribution of the simple syrup over the entire cake. Plus, for me, this is just a fun way to take a good 360° look at the cake I’ve worked so hard to make.

You can find the pastry brush that I recommend here. My off-brand pastry brushes are very old and I frankly couldn’t find them anywhere online, but I trust the OXO brand because they make so many quality items, so it is without hesitation that I recommend their pastry brushes to you.

Parchment Paper

Parchment paper is invaluable for pound cakes, both for the simple syrup phase and the final glaze.

Because, as I said before, baking is a messy business. If you put a piece of parchment paper underneath the cooling rack for the simple syrup and final glaze stages, you will have the utterly satisfying experience of crumpling the soiled paper and just…throwing it away.

Parchment paper comes in rolls, like aluminum foil, but it can be cut to fit round, square, or rectangular pans when necessary.

We love parchment.

Cake Carrier

Baking a pound cake is a good five-hour process. At the end of that process, you’ll want a proper cake keeper to display and protect your hard work! Whether you’re traveling with your pound cake or you’re serving it at home, I recommend putting your cake on a cake round and using this Nordic Ware Bundt Cake Keeper. It’s sturdy enough to protect and secure your pound cake so that you can confidently and safely transport your cake to its final destination, and it’s also pretty enough to showcase your hard work without having to buy another cake stand.

Photo Credit: Amazon

Conclusion

I truly hope that this guide was helpful for you as you’re preparing to bake pound cakes for this holiday season (and beyond!). I literally cannot wait to see the perfection that you create! Whether you choose one of the Begin with Butter recipes or you use some BwB techniques on your favorite recipes, tag @beginwithbutter on Instagram so we can shout out YOUR success!

Happy baking!

-S


Processing…
Success! You're on the list.

Check us out in Instagram @beginwithbutter!


Technique Tips for the Best Pound Cakes (& Big News!)

Friends, it’s time.

The holidays are peeking around the corner, and it’s time for us bakers to shine.

Bundt pans…activated.
Photo Credit: Ashleigh Bing Photography

Whether you’re planning to spend time with extended family, or you’re having an intimate gathering for two, there’s always room for dessert, am I right?

If you’ve been reading BwB for a while, you’re ready! It’s just a matter of gathering the ingredients and using your newfound baking confidence to execute some amazing pound cake recipes!

But where are the recipes, You ask?

Well, Beloved, that’s the fun part. The recipes are arriving on Black Friday in a BIG WAY!

Okay…Here’s the News!

Beginning on Black Friday, Begin with Butter is going to be the exclusive home of the Twelve Days of Pound Cake Holiday Event!

That’s right. TWELVE. Twelve different pound cakes, with concise step-by-step directions that will help you execute them perfectly for all of your holiday events. Twelve different recipe posts. Twelve consecutive days.

I am still a firm believer that you don’t need a specific recipe to be successful. But so many of you asked for recipes and I’m happy to share.

So share I will! Starting on November 26th, I’m going to share all of the pound cake recipes you’ll ever want for the holidays. It’s my hope that these recipes become staples on your holiday and Sunday dinner tables.

Beginners Start Here

If you’re new to Begin with Butter…WELCOME! This is a super fun community of people from all over the world, and on behalf of everyone here, I’d like to welcome you with open arms.

If you’re brand new to baking, and you need some background before you begin, here are a few BwB resources that will get you off to a great start:

Of course, learning about ingredients can never hurt, so here’s a link to the Equipment and Ingredients section of the site. This is a great resource for your pound cakes and everything else you want to bake!

These resources aren’t mandatory to make great cakes, but doing a little bit of homework beforehand can help new bakers avoid common pitfalls in the kitchen. That’s how bakers build kitchen confidence!

Pound Cake Tips

Before we even start the Twelve Days of Pound Cake, there are a few great tips that will help you be successful with any pound cake:

Start with Room Temperature Ingredients.

Room temperature ingredients mix quickly and incorporate easily. This is a great way to avoid over-mixing your pound cake batter! It’s also a great way to avoid taxing your hand mixer or your stand mixer and sending it to its demise.

Invest in a Food Scale.

I can’t drive this point home enough. An inexpensive food scale is your best friend in the kitchen because it ensures consistency and prevents heavy-handedness with ingredients. With 10-cup pound cakes, the last thing you want in your batter is unintended extra flour!

You can find my faves here and here.

Properly Cream Butter and Sugar Before Adding Eggs and Other Ingredients.

Friends, this will change your baking immensely. I believe in this technique so much that I devoted a whole post to it! You can check it out here. There’s videos and photos so that you can see with your own eyes what “creamed” butter and sugar should look like! Since the rise in a pound cake relies very heavily on this step, I wanted to make sure you had everything that you needed to be successful.

Use a Light Touch with Leavening.

My pound cakes have a characteristic tight crumb. I always joke that I like the tight crumb because it allows me to walk around the house with a piece of cake in my hand and not get crumbs everywhere. #NotReallyJoking.

This tight crumb has a lot to do with the fact that pound cakes traditionally don’t need a lot of leavening to be successful (and some don’t need any leavening at all!). Some use as little as a quarter of a teaspoon and they come out beautifully every time! The best advice is to follow the recipe and use a level scoop! You can learn much more about leavening here.

Please Grease Your Pans.

You might have already heard of the mythical “non-stick” bundt pan. This is, in fact, a myth! While manufacturers like Nordic Ware do market their bundt pans as “non-stick”, even Nordic Ware will tell you to grease your pans. That’s because Nordic Ware made its non-stick pans so that they would be easier to clean, not easier to remove cake.

To grease my pans, I use softened butter and flour, and I use a pastry brush to get the butter into those deep crevices that just love to trap cake.

Use an Oven Thermometer.

My pound cakes really rely on accurate baking temps. If the oven temperature is too low, you can expect the cake to overflow its baking pan because the cake won’t set before it rises. If the oven temperature is too high, the outside will burn and the inside will be raw. Both of these are sad events.

These events can be avoided with an oven thermometer, which you can find for less than ten dollars right here.

Give Yourself Enough Time.

Starting a cake (or any baked good) too late is a recipe for an unhappy and stressful day. The pound cakes on my Twelve Days of Pound Cakes list are show-stopping to be sure, BUT they are a time commitment. None of them are going to take you less than 3-5 hours to complete. And my carrot cake recipe? You might as well start that one a day or two in advance.

They’ll be more than worth it though. I promise. 😊

The best way to figure out if you have enough time to execute a cake is to read the whole recipe from start to finish before you take out your first bowl or whisk. That way, you’ll be assured that your cake will be ready to present to your guests as soon as the dinner plates are cleared.

Conclusion.

These are some quick and easy pound cake tips that you can practice as you prepare for your Sundays and holidays. I am extremely excited to bring these twelve pound cakes to you all, and I hope you find something on the list to absolutely astound your friends and family this season.

Until next time!


Don’t forget to subscribe while you’re here so that you can get each pound cake recipe delivered directly to your inbox!

Processing…
Success! You're on the list.