How to Grease a Bundt Pan

Hey Family!

Thank you again for your unwavering support of Begin with Butter, and for the overwhelming response to the Twelve Days of Pound Cakes Holiday Event. It is so encouraging to see all of the pictures from BwB community members who are making these recipes!

These beautiful bundt cakes all came from my kitchen, the recipes came from my heart, and you can hyperlink to the recipes by clicking the pictures above!

After the event, the most pressing question on BwB Members’ minds has been: how do you consistently get your pound cakes out of their pans and into these intricate designs?

I’ve got you all. Because this?

This isn’t cake. It’s trifle. And I don’t ever want you to experience this trauma ever again.

In this Article

Tools and Ingredients Used

There are a few ways to grease bundt pans for baking. I didn’t learn much about baking as a kid, but I did learn that butter and flour were my mother’s preferred way of greasing a bundt pan.

So I use butter and flour.

There are myriad ways to grease a bundt pan, though, and sometimes it takes trial and error before you find your go-to. Some people prefer non-stick sprays specifically that are specifically designed for baking (they contain flour; regular non-stick won’t work well); others prefer shortening and flour; still others like a homemade cake release, like this one found on the Grandbaby Cakes site.

My preferred way is to use butter and flour, and that is what I’ll demonstrate for you today. But I encourage you to try more than one and see what works for you!

My Favorite Bundt Pans

I’ve used several kinds of bundt pans since I started baking in 2014. To show you what the cakes from each pan look like, I thought I’d use cake photos to take you on a trip down memory lane.

Wilton Perfect Results Premium Non-Stick Tube Pan

I started with this Wilton bundt pan, and found that it was very forgiving for me as a new baker. Even during my earliest days, when I was experimenting with lemon pound cake recipes and cake release techniques, this pan released cleanly on a regular basis.

Wilton Bake it Better Non-Stick Flower Tube Pan

This Wilton bundt pan is also very forgiving and also releases very nicely, and has a bit of a pattern for those of you who want to jazz up your cakes a bit.

Evolution

After a couple of years, I started to see mind-blowingly stunning bundt cakes, and I had to know the details for those bundt pans. And that, Friends, is when I was introduced to Nordic Ware bundt pans.

Nordic Ware pans have no time and no chill when it comes to proper greasing, and they have no qualms about grabbing a chunk of your cake. While they do have a non-stick coating, the designs are just so so intricate that they create plenty of potential sticking points. And, Friends, it only takes one good sticking point to get back here:

Yes, I know I used this photo twice. Because this right here scarred me for LIFE.

Even though the risks run high, I’m hooked on Nordic Ware pans. I currently have four of them in heavy rotation, and I’m angling for just one or two more (😉). Here are my pans!

**I am an Amazon Affiliate and am paid a small commission if you purchase from any of these links.**

Nordic Ware Elegant Party Bundt Pan

I love the beautiful, classic design of the Elegant Party Bundt Pan:

Nordic Ware Cut Crystal Bundt Pan

The intricate design on the Cut Crystal Bundt Pan commands attention on every table.

Nordic Ware Fleur De Lis Bundt Pan

The Fleur De Lis Bundt Pan is a timeless pan that creates an elegant and show-stopping design.

Nordic Ware Brilliance Bundt Pan

The precision cakes that come out of the Brilliance Bundt Pan are a literal sight to behold.

No matter which bundt pan you choose, Friends, you’ll need to properly prep it before baking. So let’s get into It!

Technique for Greasing Bundt Pans

Typically, in cake recipes, you’ll see a direction to prepare your bundt pan before you make your batter.

I don’t do that. You can absolutely do that if it makes you more comfortable, but I’ve found over the years that butter and flour sitting in a cake pan for too long can create an unpleasant crust on the outside of my cakes. Since bundt cakes prominently feature the actual cakes themselves, and aren’t typically covered by buttercream, I wanted to do away with that unsightly crust.

That’s why I started prepping my pans after the batter was done. While you do have to work quickly (especially with baking soda cakes), I’ve found that putting prepared batter into a freshly prepped bundt pan cuts down dramatically on that ugly crust.

Here’s the technique:

  • The very first thing I do when I’m baking is take out the cold ingredients (including the butter) for my recipe so that they can come to room temperature. At this time, I also take out the bundt pan, and put about two tablespoons of butter in it. This is the key for being able to prep your pan quickly.
  • Allow the butter to soften right in the bundt pan while you prepare your cake batter.
  • Once the batter is done, use a pastry brush to distribute the butter over the entire pan. Don’t forget the center of the pan! This is the most time consuming step, so take your time.
  • When you’re done brushing the butter, your pan should look like this:
  • After your pan is completely buttered, add about two tablespoons of flour (or, if you’re making chocolate or red velvet cake, about 2.5 tablespoons of cocoa powder). Gently distribute the flour/cocoa powder over all of the butter in the pan. I use a “tap tap turn” method that I describe in detail in this video!
  • Use the buttered pastry brush to quickly brush any spots that you missed the first time around. You’ll know that you missed the spot because the flour won’t adhere to it.
  • Once you’re done covering the entire pan with flour, remove the excess from the pan because you don’t want the extra flour in your cake batter. I did this on the countertop in the video for demonstration purposes, but you can absolutely do this over a clean sink as well.
  • You’re ready to go when your pan looks like this!

And that’s it! You’re ready for batter, and you can bake confidently, knowing that your cakes will come out of your bundt pan.

I hope you found this tip helpful! Happy bundt baking!


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The Lemon Meringue Pound Cake

Friends. We made it.

It’s Day 12 of the Begin with Butter Twelve Days of Pound Cake Holiday Event, and when I say I am flabbergasted at the response from you all so far?

I’m over the moon, confounded and grateful. So grateful for the wholeheartedly sweet responses, and so impressed by the cakes that I’ve seen online! You all are doing it! Your holiday tables are going to be so blessed!

Today, for the grande finale, I present to you:

The Lemon Meringue Pound Cake.

This one is dedicated to my amazing hubby. Through the tart and the sweet of marriage, he’s been quietly steadfast, loyal and loving. When I create tumult (which I am known to do), he’s the steadying presence. When I am dramatic and over-the-top, he’s the bedrock.

Whether he’s rehoming a snake from our driveway late at night for me with an empty Ronzoni pasta box (I’m petrified of snakes but can’t stand to see them hurt or killed), boogie boarding with me on red/yellow flag days (ouch), building me a beautiful garden for much-needed R&R, or laughing with our babies and dogs on Saturday mornings, he’s my heart.

I’m sure I dance on all of his nerves at times. Just tip-tap-tapping away with my antics. But he barely reacts. It’s miraculous, really.

We’re a good match. And of all of the cakes in this event, he loved this one most.

About this Cake

Let’s get into this cake Family. There are layers and layers of lemon in this cake. From the lemon zest in the batter to the lemon curd swirl, to the lemon simple syrup, this Lemon Meringue Pound Cake is THAT CAKE. Because the goal is always balance, I wanted the lemon to be powerful but nuanced. And this cake achieves that on many levels when it’s done right.

The contrasting textures (from the perfect sponge of the cake to the smoothness of the curd to the airiness of the caramelized meringue) must be experienced to be believed.

For the lemon curd, I used this recipe from one of my favorite bloggers, Cheryl at Bakes by Brown Sugar. Her recipe is pitch perfect for flavor, texture and aroma, and the recipe itself wonderfully-written in a way that can make even first-time curd makers brilliantly successful. I use her lemon curd recipe exclusively and have never had anything but consistent success. It’s a grand slam in this cake.

The lemon curd recipe, as written, makes more than double what you’ll need for this cake. But I still made the full recipe anyway, since lemon curd is so versatile and I always find uses for it in my kitchen.

May you love this cake as much as my husband does.

Beginners Start Here

If you’re new to baking, or if your stand mixer is covered in dust, here are a couple of articles from the BwB site that will help you get off to a great start with this recipe!

These resources are never mandatory reading, but they are super useful to help you understand the techniques that you’ll need to successfully execute this amazing cake. Happy Reading!

Important Tools Used in this Recipe

Below, you’ll find some tools that I used for this pound cake, as well as all of the pound cakes in this event. They’re what I use in my kitchen for just about everything that I bake. **I get paid a small commission if you purchase directly from some of these links, but they are truly amazing products that you’ll find in my kitchen.**

If you have them already, great! Think of this as a checklist to help you build the confidence that you’ll need to execute this recipe!

Friends, I present to you, the recipe for The Lemon Meringue Pound Cake!

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The Lemon Meringue Pound Cake


  • Author: Shani

Description

This lemon meringue pound cake has layers of perfectly-balanced lemon that will satisfy the most discerning lemon pound cake lover.  Whether it’s for a holiday table or a “just because” brunch, this cake is sure to wow a crowd with its looks and flavor.


Ingredients

Units Scale

For the Batter:

  • 384 g flour, plus 2 tbsp for greasing the pan
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tbsp lemon zest (about 1 lemon)
  • 230 g butter, plus 2 tbsp for greasing the pan
  • 500 g sugar
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 63 g whole milk
  • 188 g whole milk ricotta cheese
  • ~175 g (~1/2 c) lemon curd (recipe from Bakes by Brown Sugar)

For the Simple Syrup:

  • 85 g water
  • 67 g sugar
  • 1 tbsp freshly squeezed lemon juice

For the Meringue Topping:

  • 5 large egg whites
  • 300 g granulated sugar

Instructions

Before the Batter:

  1. Prepare the lemon curd (recipe at Bakes by Brown Sugar) at least four hours in advance.  It needs time to set up (coagulate) in your refrigerator so that it won’t be runny in your cake batter.

To Make the Batter with a Stand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  It’s highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for this recipe, since proper oven temperature will impact the outcome of your cake.
  2. Combine the flour and baking soda in a medium bowl.
  3. Sift the flour mixture into another medium bowl.  Add kosher salt to the flour mix and whisk to combine.
  4. Place the room temperature butter in the bowl of your stand mixer.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (30 seconds)
  5. Slowly add the granulated sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (5-10 minutes)
  6. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  Don’t skimp on this step because proper creaming helps your cake rise!  (7 minutes)
  7. Add vanilla extract and lemon zest and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  8. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (30-45 seconds)
  9. With the mixer on the lowest speed, add all of the whole milk and whole milk ricotta and mix until just combined.  (~1 minute).
  10. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (~1 minute)
  11. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Then, stir the batter until it is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to fully scrape the bottom of the bowl during this step!
  12. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with the remaining butter and flour.
  13. Using a large ice cream scoop, cover the bottom of the bundt pan with full scoops of batter.  Once the bottom is completely covered, tap the bundt pan on your countertop to level out the batter.
  14. Make a well, about 1/2” deep, in the leveled batter.  Using a small spoon, fill the well with lemon curd.
  15. Using a toothpick, swirl the lemon curd in the batter, making sure that the lemon curd doesn’t touch the sides of the bundt pan in too many spots.  Wherever the lemon curd touches the bundt pan, it will substantially caramelize (and it might burn).
  16. Repeat the steps (ice cream scoop, tap to level, create well for lemon curd, swirl) with the remaining batter.  I usually end up with three layers in my bundt pan.

To Make the Batter with a Hand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  It’s highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for this recipe, since proper oven temperature will impact the outcome of your cake.
  2. Combine the flour and baking soda in a medium bowl.
  3. Sift the flour mixture into another medium bowl.  Add kosher salt to the flour mix and whisk to combine.
  4. Place the room temperature butter in a large mixing bowl.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (~1 minute)
  5. Add half of the sugar and mix until the sugar is just incorporated.  (~30 seconds)
  6. Add the second half of the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (7-12 minutes)
  7. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 1 minute after each addition.  Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  Don’t skimp on this step because proper creaming helps your cake rise!  (7 minutes)
  8. Add vanilla extract and lemon zest and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  9. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (30-45 seconds)
  10. Add all of the whole milk and whole milk ricotta and mix on lowest speed until just combined.  (~1 minute).
  11. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined. (1-2 minutes)
  12. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Then, mix the batter until it is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to fully scrape the bottom of the bowl!
  13. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with the remaining butter and flour.
  14. Using a large ice cream scoop, cover the bottom of the bundt pan with full scoops of batter.  Once the bottom is completely covered, tap the bundt pan on your countertop to level out the batter.
  15. Make a well, about 1/2” deep, in the leveled batter.  Using a small spoon, fill the well with lemon curd.
  16. Using a toothpick, swirl the lemon curd in the batter, making sure that the lemon curd doesn’t touch the sides of the bundt pan in too many spots.  Wherever the lemon curd touches the bundt pan, it will substantially caramelize (and it might burn).
  17. Repeat the steps (ice cream scoop, tap to level, create well for lemon curd, swirl) with the remaining batter.  I usually end up with three layers in my bundt pan.

To Bake the Cake:

  1. Bake the cake at a true 325°F for 60-70 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer reads 210°F-215°F.  My preferred internal temperature for this cake is 212°F.  Alternately, the cake is done with a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean and a fingerprint indentation bounces back.
  2. Allow the cake to rest for ten minutes while you make the simple syrup.

To Make the Lemon Simple Syrup:

  1. Combine sugar and water in a small saucepan and bring to a boil.  Stir occasionally until the sugar is completely dissolved.
  2. Remove the simple syrup from the heat and add lemon juice. Stir until incorporated.
  3. After allowing the cake to rest for ten minutes, invert it onto a cooling rack and carefully remove the bundt pan.
  4. Using a pastry brush, gently brush the lemon simple syrup over the entire cake.
  5. Allow the cake to cool completely.  (3-5 hours)

To Make the Meringue:

  1. Bring 2” of water to a low boil in a large (3 qt.) sauce pan.  Reduce to a simmer.
  2. Carefully separate five eggs, placing the whites in a clean, nonreactive metal bowl (either a stand mixer or large stainless steel bowl).  Add sugar and stir to combine.
  3. Place metal bowl over the top of the sauce pan while the water is simmering.  Whisk the egg white mixture over the sauce pan until all of the sugar is completely dissolved.  (~3 minutes)
  4. Remove the metal bowl from the stove.  Using the whisk attachment on either your hand mixer or your stand mixer, whisk the mixture on lowest speed until it is nearly opaque.  (~1-3 minutes)
  5. Increase the mixer to medium speed until the mixture begins to look light and fluffy.  (~4 minutes for stand mixer; ~5-7 minutes for hand mixer)
  6. Increase the mixer to highest speed until the meringue is done.  To check the meringue, remove the whisk attachment from the mixture and invert it.  If the meringue slowly folds down over the whisk attachment, it’s complete. (~2 minutes for stand mixer; ~3 minutes for hand mixer)
  7. Using an offset spatula, quickly spread the meringue over the cooled cake.  If desired, use a butane torch to toast the meringue.

To Store:

This cake can remain on a countertop overnight, or then it can be stored in a refrigerator for up to a week.

Notes

  • As with all of the pound cakes in this event, this is a big cake.  It is best to place a sheet pan underneath the cake while it bakes, for extra insurance against spills.
  • Take care in adding the lemon curd to the batter.  If lemon curd spills out of the well that you create and touches the sides, it will caramelize and possibly burn.  A small amount of this is okay, but you want to avoid it as much as possible.
  • An oven thermometer is strongly recommended to make sure that your oven reaches the correct temperature.
  • It is also strongly recommended to use a digital food scale to measure ingredients using metric measurement. It will seriously make your baking so much easier!
  • Make sure you take your time to cream the butter and sugar on the front end!  Once you add your flour mixture, you have to mix gently in order to avoid over-mixing.

Friends, I have felt all of the emotions during these last twelve days. But none more than utter gratitude for your support. I am so proud of every pound cake in this lineup, and I can’t wait to see your interpretations this holiday season and beyond!

Happy baking! À bientôt!

-S


Check out the Other Pound Cakes from the BwB Twelve Days of Pound Cake Holiday Event!


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The Champagne Pound Cake

Friends, it’s Day 11 of the Twelve Days of Pound Cake!

It’s time to bring out the celebration pound cake!

Meet The Champagne Pound Cake.

This one is bubbly and light and the taste goes straight to your head. But there’s no hangover and no regret afterwards.

The texture is quintessentially pound cake, but the taste is so airy and dreamy that you have to do double take. That texture comes from the bubbly, instead of chemical leavening.

A note about the bubbly: it’s very important to use a dry (brut) sparkling wine (or, if you’re fancy, brut champagne) with this recipe. You have much better control over the sweetness level of this cake if you use a dry sparkling wine; by controlling the sweetness, you create a delicious, tremendously balanced dessert.

And, Family, the taste…it’s just delightful. By using that dry sparkling wine, you can pick up on the very slight berry notes in this cake, which come from the blackcurrants in the creme de cassis. You can also use Chambord if you’re really feeling fancy, but I didn’t want to literally bake Chambord into a cake.

This pound cake would pair exceptionally well with heavy apps at a NYE gathering. Be forewarned, though, it will likely disappear before midnight!

Let’s get to it!

Beginners Start Here

If you’ve read some of my recipes so far, you know that this is the section where I share other BwB resources that might help you execute this cake to the best of your ability. Whether you’re new to baking or you’re a seasoned veteran who’s getting back into it, here are some baking resources to help you take your baking to the next level!

These resources are super useful to help you understand the techniques that you’ll need to successfully execute this amazing cake, and all of the recipes on this site.

Important Tools Used in this Recipe

Below, you’ll find some tools that I used for this pound cake, as well as all of the pound cakes in this event. They’re what I use in my kitchen for just about everything that I bake. **I get paid a small commission if you purchase directly from some of these links, but they are truly amazing products that you’ll find in my kitchen.**

If you have them already, great! Think of this as a checklist to help you build the confidence that you’ll need to execute this recipe!

Ready for the recipe? Here it is!

Print
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The Champagne Pound Cake


  • Author: Shani
  • Prep Time: 40 minutes (active)
  • Inactive Time: 3-5 hours
  • Cook Time: 55-65 minutes
  • Total Time: ~5-7 hours
  • Yield: 14 servings 1x

Description

This pound cake has the quintessential pound cake texture, while simultaneously tasting airy and light.  Slight berry notes make this a perfect celebration cake for New Year’s Eve or any special occasion.


Ingredients

Units Scale

For the Batter:

  • 384 g all purpose flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 500 g sugar
  • 230 g butter
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 2 tsp strawberry or raspberry extract, or creme de cassis or Chambord
  • 250 g dry (brut) sparkling wine

For the Simple Syrup:

  • 67 g granulated sugar
  • 84 g water
  • 2 tsp creme de cassis or Chambord
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla
  • 1/8 tsp salt

For the Final Glaze:

  • 240 g confectioner’s sugar
  • 3 tbsp dry sparkling wine or whole milk
  • 1 tbsp heavy cream
  • 1 tsp clear vanilla extract
  • 1/s tsp fine sea salt

Garnish Ideas:

  • Sugared Cranberries (find the recipe here)
  • Orange Slices
  • Orange Zest
  • Raspberries
  • Decorating Sugar

Instructions

To Make the Batter with a Stand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  An oven thermometer will help you determine where you need to set your oven in order to get to a true 325°F.
  2. Sift the flour into a medium bowl.  Add kosher salt to the mix and whisk to combine.
  3. Place the room temperature butter in the bowl of your stand mixer.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (30 seconds)
  4. Slowly add the granulated sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (5-10 minutes)
  5. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  This step is especially important for cake rise in this particular cake, as there is no chemical leavening. (7 minutes)
  6. Add vanilla extract and strawberry extract/raspberry extract/creme de cassis/Chambord (whichever you choose to use) and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  7. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (30-45 seconds)
  8. With the mixer on the lowest speed, add all of the dry sparkling wine and mix until just combined.  Don’t add too quickly or the carbonation will bubble over!  (~1 minute)
  9. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  Stop mixing just as soon as the mixture is fully together.  (~1 minute)
  10. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Then, mix the batter until it is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to fully scrape the bottom of the bowl!
  11. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with the remaining butter and flour and place the batter in the pan.

To Make the Batter with a Hand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  An oven thermometer will help you determine where you need to set your oven in order to get to a true 325°F.
  2. Sift the flour into a medium bowl.  Add kosher salt and whisk until combined.
  3. Place the room temperature butter in a large mixing bowl.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (~1 minute)
  4. Add half of the sugar and mix until the sugar is just incorporated.  (~30 seconds)
  5. Add the second half of the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (7-12 minutes)
  6. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  This step is especially important for cake rise in this particular cake, as there is no chemical leavening. (7 minutes)
  7. Add vanilla extract and strawberry extract/raspberry extract/creme de cassis/Chambord (whichever you choose to use) and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  8. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (30-45 seconds)
  9. Add all of the dry sparkling wine and mix on lowest speed until combined.  (~1 minute).
  10. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  Stop mixing as soon as the mixture is fully together.  (1-2 minutes)
  11. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Then, mix the batter until it is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to fully scrape the bottom of the bowl!
  12. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with the remaining butter and flour and place the batter in the pan.

To Bake the Cake:

  1. Bake the cake at a true 325°F for 55-65 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer reads 210°F-215°F.  Alternately, the cake is done with a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean and a fingerprint indentation bounces back.
  2. Allow the cake to rest for ten minutes while you make the simple syrup.

To Make the Simple Syrup:

  1. Combine sugar, water, and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a boil.  Stir occasionally until the sugar is completely dissolved.  Remove from the heat.
  2. Add the vanilla extract and creme de cassis or Chambord.  Stir until combined.
  3. After allowing the cake to rest for ten minutes, invert it onto a cooling rack and carefully remove the bundt pan.
  4. Using a pastry brush, gently brush the simple syrup over the entire cake.
  5. Allow the cake to cool completely.  (3-5 hours)

To Make the Final Glaze:

  1. Combine the confectioner’s sugar, fine sea salt, and dry sparkling wine or whole milk in a large bowl.
  2. Mix with a whisk or a spoon until almost smooth.  (1-3 minutes).
  3. Add heavy cream and stir until smooth.
  4. Completed glaze should be just pourable and should have the consistency of thick honey.
  5. Using a spouted measuring cup, spoon, or squeeze bottle, drizzle final glaze over the cake.  For the photos here, I used a squeeze bottle.

To Store:

This cake can be stored on the countertop for one day, and then refrigerated for up to seven days.

Notes

  • An oven thermometer is strongly recommended to make sure that your oven reaches the correct temperature.
  • It is also strongly recommended to use a digital food scale to measure ingredients using metric measurement. It will seriously make your baking so much easier!
  • This recipe can be halved for a loaf pan or a 6-cup bundt pan.
  • Make sure you take your time to cream the butter and sugar on the front end!  Once you add your flour mixture, you have to mix gently in order to avoid over-mixing.
  • This is a big bundt cake.  I recommend placing a sheet pan underneath this cake while it bakes for extra insurance.
  • Category: Dessert
  • Cuisine: American

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 Slice
  • Calories: 498
  • Sugar: 57.9 g
  • Sodium: 387.1 mg
  • Fat: 15.8 g
  • Carbohydrates: 79.7 g
  • Protein: 5.7 g
  • Cholesterol: 115.6 mg

Tomorrow is the Grande Finale! See you then!


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Gingerbread Pound Cake

Alexa, play “This is Christmas” by Luther Vandross.

I don’t know about Y’all, but there’s a definite point when I catch the holiday spirit. It’s not really marked by the end of Thanksgiving or a specific target date.

For me, it’s the very moment when my daughter smells gingerbread anything; it elicits a response of sheer joy in her eyes, and it’s quite a sight to behold. For me, that’s when I start to feel like The Holidays are here.

And my daughter absolutely lights up at the sight of gingerbread. Gingersnaps. Gingerbread cookies. Ginger cake.

This year, I developed this one for her:

I have to chuckle because this cake is currently a shell of what it was when I took these photos. I have a very soft spot in my heart for my kid who sneaks slices of her favorite new gingerbread cake.

About this Gingerbread Pound Cake

This is for my ginger cake lovers. This is the real deal; the molasses-y, assertively spice-forward cake that fragrances your whole house for hours. It takes a bit more effort to mix, a bit longer to bake, and even longer to cool. But it is totally worth the effort if ginger perfection is what you seek.

I’m not joking about the fragrance of this cake. As I write this blog post, several hours after it came out of the oven, the dominant smell in my house is still this unbelievable Gingerbread Pound Cake.

Alexa play “All I Want for Christmas is You” by Mariah Carey and let’s get into details.

Beginners Start Here

If you’ve read some of my recipes so far, you know that this is the section where I share other BwB resources that might help you execute this cake to the best of your ability. Whether you’re new to baking or you’re a seasoned veteran who’s getting back into it, here are some baking resources to help you take your baking to the next level!

These resources are super useful to help you understand the techniques that you’ll need to successfully execute this amazing Gingerbread Pound Cake, and all of the recipes on this site.

Important Tools Used in this Recipe

Below, you’ll find some tools that I used for this pound cake, as well as all of the pound cakes in this event. They’re what I use in my kitchen for just about everything that I bake. **I get paid a small commission if you purchase directly from some of these links, but they are truly amazing products that you’ll find in my kitchen.**

If you have them already, great! Think of this as a checklist to help you build the confidence that you’ll need to execute this recipe!

Onward to the recipe, gingerbread lovers!

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Gingerbread Pound Cake


  • Author: Shani
  • Prep Time: 40 minutes (active)
  • Inactive Time: 3-5 hours
  • Cook Time: 60-70 minutes
  • Total Time: ~5-7 hours
  • Yield: 14 servings 1x

Description

This is the stunning gingerbread cake you’ve been waiting for to grace your holiday table.  This cake is not shy on the spices, and it will satisfy gingerbread fans everywhere!`


Ingredients

Units Scale

For the Batter:

  • 384 g flour
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 1 tbsp ginger
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/2 tsp allspice
  • 1/4 tsp cloves
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 173 g (3/4 c) butter (I used salted)
  • 400 g (2 c) brown sugar (I used dark brown sugar)
  • 5 eggs
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 255 g molasses
  • 63 g buttermilk

For the Vanilla Simple Syrup:

  • 1/3 c water
  • 1/3 c granulated sugar
  • 1/8 tsp
  • 1 tsp vanilla

For the Final Glaze:

  • 240 g confectioner’s sugar
  • 34 tbsp whole milk (start with 3)
  • 1 tbsp heavy cream
  • 1 tsp vanilla
  • 24 tsp rum or rum extract (optional)
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1/8 tsp fine sea salt

Instructions

To Make the Batter with a Stand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  An oven thermometer will help you determine where you need to set your oven in order to get to a true 325°F.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, ginger nutmeg, allspice, and cloves.
  3. Sift the flour mixture into another medium bowl.  Add kosher salt to the mix and whisk to combine.
  4. Place the room temperature butter in the bowl of your stand mixer.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (30 seconds)
  5. Slowly add the brown sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  Brown sugar creams differently than granulated sugar, and it requires that you thoroughly scrape the bowl every 3-4 minutes. (8-minutes total)
  6. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the second, fourth and fifth egg for this recipe).  This step is essential to cake rise. (8 minutes)
  7. Add vanilla extract and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  8. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (30-45 seconds)
  9. With the mixer on the lowest speed, add all of the buttermilk and molasses and mix until just combined.  (~1 minute)
  10. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on medium speed until combined combined.  (~1-2 minutes)
  11. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Then, mix the batter until it is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to fully scrape the bottom of the bowl!
  12. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with the remaining butter and flour and place the batter in the pan.

To Make the Batter with a Hand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  An oven thermometer will help you determine where you need to set your oven in order to get to a true 325°F.
  2. In a medium bowl, combine the flour, baking soda, ginger nutmeg, allspice, and cloves.
  3. Sift the flour mixture into another medium bowl.  Add kosher salt and whisk until combined.
  4. Place the room temperature butter in a large mixing bowl.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (~1 minute)
  5. Add half of the brown sugar and mix until the sugar is just incorporated.  (~30 seconds)
  6. Add the second half of the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy. Brown sugar creams differently than granulated sugar, and it requires that you thoroughly scrape the bowl every 3-4 minutes. (8-12 minutes total)
  7. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 1 minute after each addition.  Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the second, fourth and fifth egg).  This step is essential to cake rise.  (7 minutes)
  8. Add vanilla extract and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  9. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (30-45 seconds)
  10. Add all of the buttermilk and molasses and mix on lowest speed until just combined.  (~1 minute).
  11. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on medium speed until completely combined.  (~1-2 minutes)
  12. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Then, mix the batter until it is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to fully scrape the bottom of the bowl!
  13. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with the remaining butter and flour and place the batter in the pan.

To Bake the Cake:

  1. Bake the cake at a true 325°F for 55-65 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer reads 212°F-220°F.  Alternately, the cake is done with a toothpick inserted into the center comes out with a few crumbs and a fingerprint indentation bounces back.
  2. Allow the cake to rest for ten minutes while you make the simple syrup.

To Make the Vanilla Simple Syrup:

  1. Combine sugar, water, and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat.  Stir occasionally until the sugar is completely dissolved.
  2. Remove the simple syrup from the heat and add vanilla. Stir until incorporated.
  3. After allowing the cake to rest for ten minutes, invert it onto a cooling rack and carefully remove the bundt pan.
  4. Using a pastry brush, gently brush the vanilla simple syrup over the entire cake.
  5. Allow the cake to cool completely.  (3-5 hours)

To Make the Final Glaze:

  1. Combine the confectioner’s sugar, whole milk, vanilla extract, rum or rum extract (if using), ginger, and fine sea salt in a medium bowl.
  2. Mix with a whisk or a spoon until slightly lumpy.  (1-2 minutes)
  3. Add heavy cream and stir until completely smooth.  (~1 minute)
  4. Using a spouted measuring cup, spoon, or squeeze bottle, drizzle final glaze over the cake.  Use a spoon to help the glaze fall over the sides of the cake.  For this specific cake, I used a squeeze bottle.

To Store:

This cake can be stored on a countertop for up to two days, and then refrigerated for up to seven days.

Notes

  • An oven thermometer is strongly recommended to make sure that your oven reaches the correct temperature.
  • It is also strongly recommended to use a digital food scale to measure ingredients using metric measurement. It will seriously make your baking so much easier!
  • This recipe can be halved for a loaf pan or a 6-cup bundt pan.
  • Make sure you take your time to cream the butter and sugar on the front end!  Once you add your flour mixture, you have to mix gently in order to avoid over-mixing.
  • This is a big bundt cake.  I recommend placing a sheet pan underneath this cake while it bakes for extra insurance.
  • Category: Dessert
  • Cuisine: American

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 Slice
  • Calories: 478
  • Sugar: 64.1 g
  • Sodium: 190.4 mg
  • Fat: 12.7 g
  • Carbohydrates: 85.8 g
  • Protein: 5.8 g
  • Cholesterol: 95.1 mg

It’s officially The Holidays in the Whisonant house! I hope you love this Gingerbread Pound Cake as much as my daughter and I!

Day 11 is TOMORROW!


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Mommy’s Lemon Lime Soda Pound Cake

Ahem…

::in Oprah Winfrey voice::

It’s Day 9!

Holy cow HOW?! Time is surely flying and I am most certainly having a ball doing this event. My friends are well fed with cake too, so win-win!

Today’s cake, Beloveds, is an homage to my mother. She was a prolific baker and this was her go-to cake. The smell of this cake in my oven transported me to childhood family dinners, and it also made me miss her something terrible.

This is Mommy’s Lemon Lime Soda Pound Cake.

If Y’all will indulge me…

Friends, my Mommy was so smart. She graduated from Tuskeegee Institute with a degree in Mathematics. There was no mathematics that ever eluded her; I truly believe that she saw life in theorems and proofs. When I was studying for the A/B Calculus AP Exam (a thousand years ago), she patiently walked me through every practice problem, staying up late with me even when it meant that she went to bed even later than her midnight bedtime.

My Mommy was so kind. She was the parent who quietly gave to several charitable organizations without expectation of accolade. When she didn’t have money, she gave her time. She was particularly fond of the Special Olympics, and gave herself completely to the local Special Olympics where I grew up.

She loved her children ferociously. I always knew that my mother would drop everything for me if I truly needed her. She was an exceptionally busy, yuppie-generation corporate executive in the 80s, but she never made me feel like a burden when I was running a high temperature, or when I just needed to have a good cry. I hope that my own children feel that same unconditional love.

Y’all. My Mommy was so, so many other things. She was strong in character. She was patient. She was so very beautiful. And she could dress. My goodness, her sense of style was impeccable.

This is her cake, my way.

About this Cake

This cake is a take on the classic 7-Up Cake that my mother adapted and perfected when I was young. This was the cake she made to placate us children while she and my father indulged in my aunt’s rum cake.

She wrote this recipe on index cards many times for other people.

Kinda like…I’m writing my recipes for you. Huh. Full circle moment.

While I used 7-Up for this cake in order to pay respect to my mother, you can absolutely use another lemon-lime soda. Keep in mind, though, that other lemon lime sodas will make this cake exponentially sweeter than 7-Up. The soda is necessary because there’s no chemical leavening, so best not to omit it.

If you’re looking for an amazing buttermilk/plain pound cake, though, take a look right here!

This cake is bursting with lemon-lime flavor, and it’s so adorable! I am so glad that I added this specific cake to the lineup for this holiday event, since I ate it every holiday season of my own childhood.

If you love 7-Up Cake, or if citrus cakes in general are your thing, try this adapted version of the 7-Up Cake! I know you’ll love the big punch of flavor.

Let’s do this!

Beginners Start Here

If it’s been a while since you fired up your stand mixer, or if you’re brand spanking new to baking, you can start right here. This is the section where I share other BwB resources that might help you execute this cake to the best of your ability. Whether you’re new to baking or you’re a seasoned veteran who’s getting back into it, here are some baking resources to help you take your baking to the next level!

These resources are super useful to help you understand the techniques that you’ll need to successfully execute this amazing cake, and all of the recipes on this site.

Important Tools Used in this Recipe

Below, you’ll find some tools that I used for this pound cake, as well as all of the pound cakes in this event. I use these tools in my home kitchen and vouch for absolutely all of them. **I get paid a small commission if you purchase directly from some of these links, but they are truly amazing products that you’ll find in my kitchen.**

If you have them already, great! Think of this as a checklist to help you build the confidence that you’ll need to execute this recipe!

Recipe on deck!

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Mommy’s Lemon Lime Soda Pound Cake


  • Author: Shani
  • Prep Time: 25 minutes
  • Inactive Time: 3-5 hours
  • Cook Time: 60-70 minutes
  • Total Time: ~5-7 hours
  • Yield: 14 servings 1x

Description

This classic cake is beautiful, simple, and will bring up many food memories for your friends and loved ones that grew up eating pound cake.  This simple classic still stops people in their tracks, and is worthy of any table.


Ingredients

Units Scale

For the Batter:

  • 384 g flour, plus two tablespoons for greasing the pan
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 230 g salted butter, plus two tablespoons for greasing the pan (I used Vermont Creamery Cultured Butter with Sea Salt for this specific cake; the tang is perfection for citrus cakes)
  • 500 g sugar
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 tsp lemon extract
  • 1 tsp lime extract
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 250 g lemon lime soda

For the Simple Syrup:

  • 67 g sugar
  • 84 g water
  • 1 tbsp lemon juice

For the Final Glaze:

  • 360 g confectioner’s sugar
  • 56 tbsp lemon lime soda (start with 5)
  • 1/4 tsp fine sea salt
  • Lemon and/or lime zest for garnish (optional)

Instructions

To Make the Batter with a Stand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  An oven thermometer will help you determine where you need to set your oven in order to get to a true 325°F.
  2. Sift the flour into a medium bowl.  Add kosher salt to the mix and whisk to combine.
  3. Place the room temperature butter in the bowl of your stand mixer.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (30 seconds)
  4. Slowly add the granulated sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (5-10 minutes)
  5. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  This step is especially important for cake rise in this particular cake, as there is no chemical leavening. (7 minutes)
  6. Add vanilla extract, lemon extract, and lime extract and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  7. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (30-45 seconds)
  8. With the mixer on the lowest speed, add all of the lemon lime soda and mix until just combined.  Don’t add too quickly or the carbonation will bubble over!  (~1 minute)
  9. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  Stop mixing just as soon as the mixture is fully together.  (~1 minute)
  10. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Then, mix the batter until it is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to fully scrape the bottom of the bowl!
  11. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with the remaining butter and flour and place the batter in the pan.

To Make the Batter with a Hand Mixer:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  An oven thermometer will help you determine where you need to set your oven in order to get to a true 325°F.
  2. Sift the flour into a medium bowl.  Add kosher salt and whisk until combined.
  3. Place the room temperature butter in a large mixing bowl.  Mix on low speed until smooth.  (~1 minute)
  4. Add half of the sugar and mix until the sugar is just incorporated.  (~30 seconds)
  5. Add the second half of the sugar and mix on medium speed until the mixture is light and fluffy.  (7-12 minutes)
  6. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing for at least 45 seconds after each addition.  Scrape the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed (I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth egg).  This step is especially important for cake rise in this particular cake, as there is no chemical leavening. (7 minutes)
  7. Add vanilla extract, lemon extract, and lime extract and mix until thoroughly combined.  (1 minute)
  8. Add half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  (30-45 seconds)
  9. Add all of the lemon lime soda and mix on lowest speed until combined.  (~1 minute).
  10. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix on low speed until combined.  Stop mixing as soon as the mixture is fully together.  (1-2 minutes)
  11. Using a rubber spatula, fully scrape the sides and bottom of the mixing bowl.  Then, mix the batter until it is smooth and consistent.  Make sure to fully scrape the bottom of the bowl!
  12. Grease a 10-12 cup bundt pan with the remaining butter and flour and place the batter in the pan.

To Bake the Cake:

  1. Bake the cake at a true 325°F for 60-70 minutes, or until an instant read thermometer reads 210°F-215°F.  Alternately, the cake is done with a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean and a fingerprint indentation bounces back.
  2. Allow the cake to rest for ten minutes while you make the simple syrup.

To Make the Lemon Simple Syrup:

  1. Combine sugar, water, and salt in a small saucepan and bring to a boil.  Stir occasionally until the sugar is completely dissolved.  Remove from the heat.
  2. After allowing the cake to rest for ten minutes, invert it onto a cooling rack and carefully remove the bundt pan.
  3. Using a pastry brush, gently brush the lemon simple syrup over the entire cake.
  4. Allow the cake to cool completely.  (3-5 hours)

To Make the Final Glaze:

  1. Combine the confectioner’s sugar, fine sea salt, and lemon lime soda in a large bowl.
  2. Mix with a whisk or a spoon until completely smooth.  (1-3 minutes). Add lemon lime soda, one teaspoon at a time, if the glaze is too thick to pour.
  3. Completed glaze should be just pourable and should have the consistency of thick honey.
  4. Using a spouted measuring cup, spoon, or squeeze bottle, drizzle final glaze over the cake.  For the photos here, I used a squeeze bottle.

To Store:

This cake can be stored on a countertop for up to five days.

Notes

  • It’s really important to use a food scale for this recipe.  When we don’t use digital food scales, we tend to be heavy-handed with ingredients.  This could lead to overspill in the oven.
  • This cake is a showstopper and it is big.  It needs at least a 10-cup bundt pan to be successful.  I mostly use 10-cup Nordic Ware bundt pans and it works well in those.
  • If your butter is not quite room temperature when you’re ready to bake, you can cut it into cubes and give it a few more seconds of mixing before you add the sugar.
  • Category: Dessert
  • Cuisine: American

I love you Mommy. And I hope you all love this cake.

See you tomorrow!


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