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Pumpkin Spice Pound Cake

Hi there! It’s Fall, which means that Pumpkin Season is officially upon us! That also means that the time for this Pumpkin Spice Pound Cake HAS ARRIVED!

Pull up with your pumpkin spice tea and your coziest cardigan, Beloved. This one’s quite a read. It also includes a picture tutorial so that we can make it together!

In this Post:

About Pound Cakes

The quintessential American pound cake got its name from its ingredients. A pound of flour, a pound of sugar, a pound of eggs, and a pound of butter. In theory, you should be able to take (roughly) a pound of each of those ingredients, with some milk, maybe a splash of leavening, salt and other accouterments added, and come up with a delightfully dense, rich cake with a tight crumb.

For many Black Americans in the United States, the words “pound cake” evoke powerful memories. To this day, pound cakes appear at weekly Sunday dinners and also at special holiday dinners. Pound cake travels neatly with the beloved family who’s leaving to go home after a wonderful visit. Pound cake can be a vehicle for ice cream, but also does just fine by itself. Pound cake still represents home to those who have moved far away from family.

My first memory of pound cake included me watching my mother use her Cuisinart hand mixer to mix her famous 7-Up cake, while telling me stories about what it was like to grow up in Demopolis, Alabama. She told me stories about her first crush, about growing up as the youngest of seven(!) children, and about how my grandmother was love personified while she mixed that batter. We also had some challenging conversations when she told me–over pound cake–what it was like for her as a young Black girl to come of age in the Deep South during the 1950s and 1960s. And every single one of those stories meant everything to me. They mean even more to me now that she’s not here and I’m raising my own children.

When she was done telling stories, that 7-Up cake would be in the oven and and a beater would be in my hand. I understood my assignment. That was the magic of pound cake for me; it was a connection between me and the family that was very far away. Pound cake, to me, meant connection. That connection endures to this day.

There are innumerable stories about Black people boarding buses and trains from Alabama, Mississippi, Florida, and the entire Southeastern United States, heading north and west to Los Angeles, Chicago, Milwaukee, Detroit, and New York during The Great Migration. Those migrants carried with them with bags of homemade rolls, fried chicken, and pound cake. It is a cake that endures even today, connecting generations of families in a special way that many foods cannot.

It is why, when I re-opened my custom bakery (The Gloria Bakery) in fall 2021, pound cakes were prominently and proudly featured on that menu.

About This Pumpkin Spice Pound Cake

This pound cake in particular was really fun to develop. First of all, it involves pumpkin spice, which I’m told is pretty popular in the fall (😂). Also, because pumpkin is full of water (it is about 94% water), it presented an interesting challenge for me to get the texture just right.

I love the tight crumb of a well-executed pound cake. It’s just so…satisfying. Plus, I can walk around the house with a slab of pound cake and not have it crumble all over my clothes. #NoJudgmentZone

To maintain that tight crumb with this pound cake, I ended up using pumpkin puree (not canned pumpkin pie filling) for the bulk of the liquid in this amazing cake. While you can replace canned pumpkin puree with the fresh stuff, it’s difficult to know the water content of a particular pumpkin, and whether that means you’d have to add more butter, or reduce the buttermilk.

The Technique for this Pumpkin Spice Pound Cake

Mise en Place

The cake in this recipe has a lot of dry ingredients, which can make it seem like a much more complicated bake than it really is. But once those dry ingredients are tucked into their bowl and stirred together, the rest is easy peasy!

As usual, Beloveds, the secret is in the mise en place. Any recipe can look complicated before your ingredients are neatly prepared and ready to go.

For this recipe, my mise en place (before sifting my dry ingredients) looks something like this:

For you eagle-eyed readers out there, the final recipe calls for six eggs. 😊

As you can see, my dry ingredients are together in their bowl, and all of my other ingredients are separated and measured as well. At this stage, I’m ready to mix!

In the Mix

Like many standard American pound cake recipes, this one uses the creaming method. The creaming method simply means that you mix room-temperature (70°F) butter and sugar together until the mixture has increased in volume, the the color is lighter, and the texture is much less grainy. You can click here to read more about it.

There’s video too! Click here to learn the stand mixer technique, or here to see how it’s done with a hand mixer.

Proper creaming is absolutely essential for this recipe to succeed. If you’re looking for help to figure out proper creaming technique, I hope that blog post and those videos help you achieve the pumpkin spice pound cake of your dreams!

Here’s what the creamed butter and sugar should look like:

Once the butter has reached this stage (~3-7 minutes on low/medium speed in a stand mixer, or ~5-12 minutes on medium speed with a hand mixer, as long as you’re using room temperature butter), you’re ready to add your eggs. For eggs, add them one at a time and mix each one on medium speed until thoroughly combined. For a recipe with six eggs, I usually scrape the bowl after the third and sixth eggs.

Once all of the eggs are incorporated, your batter should look dreamy and luscious.

Time for your two teaspoons of vanilla and another good mix until incorporated:

After the vanilla, give your bowl a good scraping with that silicone spatula. This is the last time during this mixing session that you’ll be able to mix mix mix to your heart’s content with a machine.

Because now it’s time for that flour mixture. First, add the first half of your flour and mix on lowest speed until just combined. You can even leave a few streaks of flour at this point:

Remember, Friend, that the introduction of flour means the start of gluten development. And too much gluten development will mean a tough cake!

Once you’ve gently mixed your first batch of flour, add all of your pumpkin at one time. Again, mix until just combined. With half of your flour already onboard, you’ll want to reduce the mixing time at this point.

From the “after” picture, above, you can see that the the pumpkin is mostly incorporated, but it’s not completely mixed into the batter. That’s okay! You can stop mixing at this point. Time for your second flour addition:

The mix on the right is where you should stop 🛑 mixing with a machine. It’s at this point that my handy-dandy silicone spatula comes into play.

I use the silicone spatula to get a get a good final scraping in my mixing bowl. Going around the sides and bottom of the bowl, I collect all of the loose flour and then do 10-15 good turns around the bowl. The result is always a smooth batter that’s not over-mixed and is ready for the oven. This is a thicker batter, and that’s okay!

Into the Oven!

This next part is not a popular opinion.

But I’m going to tell you anyway.

I don’t prepare my cake pans before I start mixing my cake batter. I know this is not a normal recommendation, so feel free to disregard it.

If you’re still reading, hear me out!

In my experience, butter and flour left in a cake pan for too long can cause an unappetizing crust on the outside of my finished pound cake. And, since the outside of the cake is so prominently featured on a pound cake, who wants that?!

One day, purely by happenstance, I forgot to prep a pan before mixing my cake batter, so I just took four minutes after the batter was done and prepped the pan at that time. I’ve done it that way ever since, using the good old butter/flour combo to make sure that things don’t stick. Before I prep my pan, I also check my cheap-o oven thermometer to make sure that my oven is truly at 325°F. (For my top oven, this means setting it to 350°F.)

You have to work pretty quickly if you choose to prep your pan after your batter! That’s why it’s helpful to take out some extra butter for your pan at the same time that you take out the butter for your recipe.

With all bundt pans, you have to butter them to within an inch of their lives before moving on to the next step. Please, Family, do not fall for the “non-stick” cake pan claims. THEY ARE NOT TRUE. I’m also not a huge fan of cooking sprays, since I find they don’t help produce the caramelization that I like to see on the top of my bundt cakes.

This is what I mean by “butter them to within an inch of their lives”:

After you’ve reached this stage, add flour and maneuver the pan around until you’ve covered all of the buttered surfaces. It’s important to remove any remaining flour when you’re done with this step (I remove extra flour by banging the pan over a countertop or clean sink):

After this step, I gently pour my batter into my prepped pan and gently even out the top with my silicone spatula:

Then it’s onto a baking sheet and into my 325°F oven for 70-80 minutes. The cake is done when a cake tester comes out clean and the top springs back under your finger, OR when an instant-read thermometer reads somewhere between 210°F and 215°F.

At this point, you can place the cake on a cooling rack and place the cake and cooling rack on top of some parchment paper. Allow it to cool for about ten minutes.

After the ten-minute timer goes off, invert the cake on top of the cooling rack, gently put it down atop the parchment paper, and say a very quick prayer (if you pray).

Then, gently lift the pan and wait for release. While there will inevitably be a few tiny crumbs that are left on the pan, as you can see, the beautiful detail from the cake pan is clearly present in the finished cake.

The Game-Changer: Simple Syrup

::Friends, come close::

This next tip is the real difference between home bakers and pros.

Two words: simple syrup.

Simple syrup is equal parts water and sugar boiled together until they achieve a watery-syrup texture. There are innumerable variations on a “simple” simple syrup, but the most common one is the plain one. For bundt cakes, I find that 100 g (.4 c) of sugar and 100 g of water (.4 c) is the perfect amount.

I make the simple syrup by just adding those two ingredients together, bringing them to a boil, then reducing to a simmer just until all of the sugar is dissolved. I do not want simple syrup that has the consistency of corn syrup or maple syrup. I prefer that it be closer to a watery texture, so that it doesn’t grab crumbs from the warm cake when I’m brushing it onto my cake with a pastry brush.

For a great video tutorial on how I use simple syrup on my cakes, check out my YouTube video, entitled “Three Tips for Making Great Cakes”! Specifically, you can jump to 3:15 in the video for the simple syrup technique.

Or you can watch the whole thing because I kinda love it. 😊

I brushed simple syrup on half of the cake and snapped a quick picture so that you can see the difference:

The Final Glaze

This, Friends, is the hardest part of the proceedings. This is the part where you wait.

Once that warm cake is brushed with warm simple syrup, it’s time to leave.

No, really. Go do something else. Because it’s going to be 3-5 hours before you can touch this cake again for the final glaze. It needs to be completely cooled before you do this last step.

To make the glaze, mix the maple syrup, maple extract (not mandatory, but extremely delicious), confectioner’s sugar, salt, and cinnamon in a small bowl.

Whisk the mixture gently until combined. Don’t worry about lumps! Just keep stirring gently.

You’re done when the mixture has the texture of thick honey.

At this point, you can either use a spouted measuring cup or a plastic squeeze bottle to pour the glaze on your finished, cooled cake.

This has been a go-to for glaze lately.

That’s it! You’re done! Time to enjoy this wonderful taste of fall that was inspired by the humble, amazing pound cake.

You’re ready! I hope you love this pumpkin spice pound cake as much as my family does. If you tried it and love it, tag me on Instagram @beginwithbutter so that I can see your masterpiece!

The Recipe

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Pumpkin Spice Pound Cake

A delightful fall treat that incorporates classic Southern bundt cake techniques with a delicious pumpkin spice blend!

  • Total Time: ~5-7 hours
  • Yield: 14 servings 1x

Ingredients

Units Scale

For the cake:

  • 384 g (3 c) all-purpose flour, plus two tablespoons for dusting bundt pan
  • 1 tsp nutmeg
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/2 tsp ground cloves
  • 1 tsp kosher salt
  • 1/4 tsp baking soda
  • 227 g (1 c) butter, room temperature, plus more for greasing bundt pan
  • 500 g (2.5 c) sugar
  • 6 eggs
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 425 g pumpkin puree, fresh or canned (not pumpkin pie filling)
  • 63 g (1/4 c) buttermilk

For the Simple Syrup:

  • 100 g (.5 c) granulated sugar
  • 100 g (.4 c) water

For the Maple Cinnamon Glaze:

  • 90 g (1/4 c) maple syrup
  • 1/4 tsp maple extract (optional)
  • 1/8 tsp cinnamon
  • 90 g (3/4 c) confectioner’s sugar
  • 1/4 tsp fine sea salt

Instructions

For the Cake Batter:

  1. Set your oven to 325°F.  It’s highly recommended to use an oven thermometer for baking, since ovens themselves are often inaccurate when it comes to temperature.
  2. Soft together the flour, nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves, salt, and baking soda in a medium bowl and set aside.
  3. Combine the buttermilk and pumpkin puree in a medium bowl.  Set aside.
  4. Place room temperature butter into a large bowl (or the bowl of your stand mixer) and mix by itself on medium speed until smooth.
  5. Reduce mixer speed to low and gradually add sugar to the smooth butter.
  6. Mix on medium speed for 3-10 minutes, scraping the sides and bottom of the bowl every 1-2 minutes, until the butter/sugar mixture is light and fluffy.  For more on how to properly cream butter and sugar (one of the most important steps!), click here.
  7. Add eggs, one at a time, scraping the sides and bottom of the bowl after the third egg and the last egg.
  8. Add vanilla and mix until thoroughly combined.
  9. With the mixer on low speed, gently add half of the flour mixture.  Mix until almost combined, with a few streaks of flour remaining.
  10. With the mixer off, add all of the pumpkin puree/buttermilk mixture at one time.  Mix until just combined.
  11. Add the rest of the flour, again mixing until combined (or until you see no more streaks of butter in the mixture).  There may be just a few streaks of flour remaining.  (See photo above.)
  12. Remove the mixer from the bowl and finish mixing the recipe by hand by scraping the sides and bottom with a silicone spatula and doing a final mix (about 10-15 turns).  
  13. Prep your 10-cup bundt pan using the reserved, softened butter and flour.  
  14. Put batter into the prepare pan and bake at 325°F for 70-80 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out completely clean.  Alternatively, you can check with an instant-read thermometer.  The cake will be done when the internal temperature reaches 210°F to 215°F.
  15. After removing the cake from the oven, place on top of a cooling rack for ten minutes while you make the simple syrup.

For the Simple Syrup:

  1. Combine granulated sugar and water in a small saucepan.
  2. Heat on medium-high heat until mixture is boiling.  Reduce to medium-low heat and simmer until the sugar is completely dissolved.
  3. Remove from heat immediately once the sugar is completely dissolved.  Use a pastry brush to brush simple syrup on the whole cake.  Allow to cool completely (3-5 hours).

For the Final Glaze:

  1. Combine maple syrup, maple extract, confectioner’s sugar, salt, and cinnamon in a medium bowl.  
  2. Stir gently with a small whisk until smooth.
  3. Using a squeeze bottle or spouted measuring cup, pour the glaze over the inside and outside of the cake.  Some of the glaze will spill over the sides.  
  4. Allow the glaze to set up for 15-20 minutes and enjoy!

 

Notes

  • This is a big, flavorful cake.  You’ll need at least a 10-cup bundt pan to make sure that it doesn’t overspill.  The combination of leavening and the air pockets from your creamed butter and sugar will make it overspill a smaller bundt pan.
  • This can be halved and made into a pumpkin loaf as well!  A 9″x5″ loaf pan is best for this one.
  • It’s especially important to measure the confectioner’s sugar for the final glaze on this cake.  Too much (>100 g) will cause the glaze will develop small holes after setting.  It will still taste delicious, but it’s a disappointing way to end all of your hard work.  
  • To store: This cake needs to be refrigerated once it’s complete.  It can last for up to seven days in the refrigerator.
  • Author: Shani
  • Prep Time: 40 minutes (active)
  • Inactive Time: 3-5 hours
  • Cook Time: 70-80 minutes
  • Category: Dessert
  • Cuisine: American

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 1 slice
  • Calories: 477
  • Sugar: 55.1 g
  • Sodium: 175.9 mg
  • Fat: 16.1 g
  • Carbohydrates: 78.5 g
  • Protein: 6.2 g
  • Cholesterol: 116 mg

I hope you enjoy this little taste of fall from Begin with Butter! If you make it, don’t forget to tag @beginwithbutter on Instagram so I can cheer your success!

-S ❤️


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    Sweet Potato Pound Cake

    This Fall, I wanted something to create something incredibly nummy. And, my friends, this Sweet Potato Pound Cake hit every. nummy. note.

    Y’all know nummy. It’s the thing you want to eat on a cool Sunday afternoon in the fall when you’re wearing sweatpants, wrapped up in a blanket, watching Netflix, listening to the rain and thoroughly enjoying the fact that you don’t have to go anywhere. Nummy.

    That was oddly specific and I feel like I just told on myself.

    Sweet Potato Pound Cake overhead picture.

    This Sweet Potato Pound Cake comes together quickly and is full of flavor. Don’t want to make sweet potato puree from scratch at the outset? No worries! Make it ahead or use the canned stuff! This, as always, is a no-judgment zone.

    But, this Fall, you’ll want to make this cake. It tastes like you spent all day on it and is as unfussy as they come.

    Beginners Start Here

    If you’re new to baking, or if you want to brush up on basics, here are a couple of super helpful articles from the BwB site that will help you get set up for success with this Sweet Potato Pound Cake.

    These resources are super helpful to help you build consistency and confidence on your baking journey. Happy Reading!

    Important Tools Used in this Sweet Potato Pound Cake

    Below, you’ll find some tools that I used for this pound cake. These are the tools that I use in my kitchen for just about everything that I bake.

    **I get paid a small commission if you purchase directly from some of these links, but they are truly amazing products that you’ll find in my kitchen.**

    Picture of sliced Sweet Potato Pound Cake

    If you have them already, great! Think of this as a checklist to help you build the confidence that you’ll need to execute this recipe!

    Y’all. I love this cake so much. You know how I feel about my Pumpkin Spice Pound Cake, but family? FAMILY? This is the one I’ll be noshing all this fall (and winter) when I have the chance to Netflix. My sweatpants and I are ready for the journey. Enjoy the recipe!

    Print
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    Sweet Potato Pound Cake

    This unfussy cake is the food equivalent of a lovie blankie.  It’s comfortable and easy and perfect for the newfound fall and winter chill in the air.  Oh, and it’s unbelievably delicious too!

    Ingredients

    Units Scale

    For the Batter:

    • 384 g all-purpose flour
    • 1/2 tsp cinnamon
    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg
    • 1 tsp kosher salt
    • 1/4 tsp baking soda
    • 345 g unsalted butter, room temperature
    • 500 g dark brown sugar
    • 5 large eggs
    • 425 g (1 can) sweet potato puree (about 1.5 large or 2.5 medium sweet potatoes)

    For the Simple syrup:

    • 84 g (1/3 c) water
    • 63 g (1/3 c) granulated sugar

    For the Vanilla Glaze:

    • 240 g (2 c) confectioner’s sugar
    • 3.5 tbsp whole milk
    • .5-1 tbsp heavy cream
    • 2 tsp vanilla extract
    • 1/2 tsp fine salt

    Instructions

    To Make Sweet Potato Puree:

    1. Peel and rinse sweet potatoes.  Dice into 1/2-inch cubes.  Place in a medium saucepan and fill the saucepan with enough water to completely cover the potatoes.
    2. Bring the potatoes to a boil, then reduce to a low boil for 10 minutes.  When potatoes are fork tender, remove from the heat and smash with a potato ricer or potato masher.  Set potatoes aside for about 30 minutes to cool to room temperature.
    3. Measure 425 grams (2 c) of sweet potatoes in a small bowl and set aside.

    To Make the Batter:

    1. Set your oven to a true 325°F.  An oven thermometer is extremely useful here, since most ovens will not reach 325°F when set to 325°F.  
    2. Sift together the all-purpose flour, cinnamon, nutmeg, kosher salt and baking soda in a medium bowl.  Set aside.
    3. Add the room temperature butter to the bowl of your stand mixer or a large mixing bowl.  Mix just the butter with your hand or stand mixer until the butter is completely smooth.  Add the brown sugar and cream until the mixture is light and fluffy.
    4. Add the eggs, one at a time, mixing each egg until it is completely incorporated in the mixture.  Scrape the sides and bowl as needed to ensure even mixing.
    5. Add the vanilla and mix thoroughly.
    6. Add half of the flour mixture and mix until just combined.
    7. Add all of the sweet potato puree and mix until just combined.
    8. Add the second half of the flour mixture and mix until just combined.  Using a rubber spatula, give the sides and bottom of the bowl a final scrape to ensure that the batter is evenly mixed.
    9. Prep a 10- or 12-cup bundt pan as you normally would (I use butter and flour to prep pans for this cake) and add the batter to the pan.  Use a rubber spatula to even out the batter, then tap the pan on the countertop several times to remove air bubbles from the batter.
    10. Bake for 55-70 minutes in a true 325°F oven, or until an instant-read thermometer reads 212°F-215°F (or a toothpick comes out completely clean).  

    To Make the Simple Syrup:

    1. Add sugar and water to a small saucepan.  Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer.  Remove from the heat as soon as the sugar is completely dissolved.
    2. Allow the cake to cool in its pan for ten minutes, then invert and place on top of a cooling rack.  Brush simple syrup on the cake and allow to cool completely.

    To Make the Vanilla Glaze:

    1. Add the confectioner’s sugar, fine sea salt, vanilla extract, and whole milk to a medium mixing bowl.  Using a 9” whisk, stir the ingredients together until all of the confectioner’s sugar is combined.
    2. Add 1/2 tbsp of the heavy cream and combine.  If you’d like to thin out the glaze further, add the second 1/2 tbsp and combine.
    3. When complete, the glaze should be the consistency of thick honey.
    4. Pour over the cake as desired, using either a spoon, spouted measuring cup, or a squeeze bottle.
    5. Cake can be stored at room temperature for one day, then refrigerated for up to a week.

    Notes

    1. Want a rum-infused glaze?  You can replace the milk in the glaze with your favorite rum (light or dark would work just fine).  Just beware that this cake is not for little ones at that point.  Want a rum flavor without the kick?  Add a teaspoon of rum extract to the glaze and leave everything the rest of the recipe as is!
    2. I think that candied pecans would top this cake beautifully.  However, my kitchen is a nut-free baking zone, so I cannot confirm this for sure. Just call it a hunch, based on prior experience of candied pecans and sweet potatoes.  😊 
    • Author: Shani

    The BwB Bread Bootcamp!

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    If you’ve been following the blog recently, you’ve probably seen that I’m a little fixated on bread at the moment. Which makes perfect sense because that means that Bread Bootcamp 2022 is right around the corner!

    Why a Bread Bootcamp?

    Bread Bootcamp is the class that you all have requested more than any other since the beginning of Begin with Butter. In every Instagram Story, in so many DMs and emails…it’s the one thing that seems to universally flummox so many of us!

    And yes, I do mean us.

    Because, Friend, bread was the ultimate flummoxer for me for many, many years. It was, quite literally, the baking skill that took the longest for me to master.

    Sunday Dinner Rolls on a sheet pan

    Now, it is the baking skill that makes me feel the most accomplished in my baking kitchen. So yes, that seemingly insurmountable learning curve was STEEP, and (also yes) there were many tears and lots of conflicting advice along the way, but it was all beyond worth it.

    I *did* waste a ton of money in ingredients though. 😬

    You asked “why” I’m teaching Bread Bootcamp? Because I don’t want you to struggle like I did. I want you to have one live, interactive weekend of intensive bread instruction so that you can be transformed into the most confident, competent, accomplished bread baker that you’ve ever been.

    Because this, my friend, is the fall that you start making the best bread of your life. Bread that’s not full of fillers and preservatives that you cannot pronounce. Bread that is beyond delicious and makes you feel like the kitchen BOSS that you are.

    What are You Covering in Bread Bootcamp?

    All of it! 😊 More specifically, though, here are a few of the topics that we’re going to be covering during our four hours together on September 17th and 18th, 2022 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. ET!

    • How Yeast Works
    • The Science of Flour (Which Ones Work in Bread, and Which Ones…Don’t)
    • Kneading, Rising, Proofing: What the Heck?
    • Lean Doughs and Enriched Doughs
    • Secrets for Different Kinds of Bread (From Yeasted Pastry to Classic White Bread)
    • Shaping Different Kinds of Bread
    • Finishing Touches for Incredible Bread

    And so, so much more. You’ll also have the opportunity to ask any specific questions during our dedicated Q&A portion each day. I’m packaging the information that took me years to master into this special LIVE event, and I hope you’ll join us!

    When is Bread Bootcamp?

    Bread Bootcamp 2022 is on September 17th and 18, 2022 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on each day. It will be on Zoom Webinars so that you can have TWO live views of everything that I’m demonstrating! And you’ll have the ability to join me on camera during Q&A if you’d like so that you can get your questions answered!

    What if I Can’t Make the Live Bootcamp on One or Both Days?

    If you can’t make the live event, no worries! The replays will be available for you forever!

    How Much is Bread Bootcamp?

    The Early Bird pricing for Bread Bootcamp is $197! Pricing goes up to $247 after September 9th at 11:59 p.m. And, while the transformative information that you’ll get in Bread Bootcamp is worth every penny of that $247, I want you to get a deal (so sign up before Friday!).

    Are There Any Freebies?

    You read my mind! YES! If you sign up for Bread Bootcamp, you’ll get a free copy of my Finishing Touches Masterclass, as well as an advance copy of my favorite cinnamon roll recipe of ALL TIME!

    Where Can I Get More Information?

    You can go straight to the Bread Bootcamp page right here, or you can send me an email!

    I hope you’re able to make it for this special event, friend! I can’t wait to teach it and I can’t wait to see you all there!

    ❤️-Shani

    Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

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    I mentioned last week in my Oatmeal Sandwich Bread post that I like a toothsome bread. Well, friends, this Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread is TOOTHSOME and I love it so much.

    Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread in a loaf pan.

    My love for toothsome bread hit hyperdrive when I was a freshman at the University of Michigan (GO BLUE!). What should have been the dreaded Freshman 15 turned into the ultra-dreaded Freshmen “more than 15”, largely because I had no self-control when it came to a local eatery called Zingerman’s Deli. If my roommate Monica and I had two nickels to rub together (and weren’t up to some other foolishness after Italian class), we were picking up our fave sandwiches from that place and enjoying every last bite.

    Those sandwiches were such a far cry from the turkey and cheese sandwiches of my Midwestern youth. Before Zingerman’s, Deli, I thought those turkey and cheese sandwiches were fancy because my mom always packed the lettuce and tomatoes separately, and she included little separate condiment packets every day! I never ever had to worry about soggy sandwiches for my school lunch, and I am ever grateful for that to this day.

    But this story is about Zingerman’s Deli. And how it changed my entire worldview on what bread could be. That amazing place changed my entire palette when it came to bread. No longer did I want the Wonder Bread of my youth. It was Rye or Whole Wheat or Sourdough or NOTHING AT ALL.

    And since my 18th year, I’ve been in search of a bread from my own kitchen that just…scratches that Zingerman’s itch. And this is the closest one that I’ve ever made.

    I hope you love this one, Friends. Because this one is ready for all of the roast beef and roast turkey breast and all the au jus that you can throw at it this fall.

    The Set Up for this Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

    This Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread makes me feel incredibly accomplished! The addition of the maple syrup made it palatable to my children, and if you know my struggles, you know that I have truly struggled to get my kiddos to eat whole wheat anything.

    *Please note that this post contains affiliate links to the ingredients and products that I use in my own kitchen.*

    Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread in a loaf pan.

    Water: Water is the liquid that I use for this bread. On paper, it seems like there’s a lot of water in this bread (about 84% hydration); however, whole wheat bread absorbs much more liquid than bread flour, so the additional water is necessary to get a great sandwich bread crumb (one that’s not too dense).

    Instant Yeast: instant yeast helps this dough to come together a little more quickly than active dry yeast. You can substitute active dry yeast, but you’ll have to extend the rise and proofing time by about fifteen minutes. I exclusively use SAF Instant Yeast for all of my sandwich breads.

    Turbinado Sugar: yeast is a living organism and it likes to eat sugar. So I give it a little turbinado sugar snack to help the initial proofing process.

    Maple Syrup: Aside from adding sweetness to this phenomenal sandwich bread, the maple syrup is the secret ingredient that softened the texture just enough for me to get my children to eat this whole wheat loaf! And that is HUGE!

    Whole Wheat Flour: Whole wheat flour is the driver behind this bread’s beautiful toothiness. Whole wheat flour is made from hard red wheat, and it uses every part of the wheat germ. White flour, by contrast, has most of the germ extracted, leaving the flour much smoother in texture and flavor. This bread is an amazing mix of Whole Wheat flour and Bread flour, which means that it maintains its delicious texture and taste, while also getting a great rise. My favorite whole wheat flour is King Arthur Baking’s Whole Wheat Flour.

    Bread Flour: I also use bread flour in this recipe. The higher protein content of bread flour lends a beautiful, more airy texture to this whole wheat loaf. For this recipe, I used King Arthur Baking’s Bread Flour.

    Kosher Salt: salt is the major flavor driver in any bread. Without salt, most bread has no taste whatsoever. I prefer kosher salt for bread, due to the larger granules. If using table salt, I recommend cutting the amount in half.

    Vital Wheat Glutenvital wheat gluten (also known as vital wheat gluten flour) is a high-gluten dough enhancer. Coming in at 80% protein, it’s an important ingredient for great crumb in sandwich loaves, especially when those sandwich loaves use whole wheat flour. I don’t recommend skipping the vital wheat gluten in this recipe; if you cannot locate it, I would recommend strongly making another type of sandwich bread. I use Bob’s Red Mill for Vital Wheat Gluten.

    Egg Wash: I use a whole egg for this sandwich bread, and I bake it to a deep golden brown. Egg wash creates an amazingly beautiful shine on this sandwich bread and helps it caramelize to an amazingly delicious point!

    Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread in a loaf pan.

    Beginners Start Here

    If you’re new to baking, or this is your first time making bread, check out some of these BwB resources to help you become more confident with this Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread!

    These resources certainly aren’t mandatory for you to successfully make this bread, but they can help answer some burning bread questions for you!

    Want to see how I shaped this dreamy sandwich bread? Check out last week’s Office Hours, where I gave viewers a sneak peek of this sandwich bread and showed them how to shape it!

    Frequently Asked Questions About Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

    How long will this bread last?

    This bread will last up to 48 hours on the countertop, or a month in the freezer.

    What is the best way to store this bread?

    Cut from the middle! I cut it from the middle instead of the ends, and I wrap it very tightly with plastic wrap to store. The bread ends help prevent the bread from becoming prematurely stale.

    Can I make this bread without vital wheat gluten?

    I wouldn’t recommend making this particular bread without vital wheat gluten. The additional gluten really helps create a proper sandwich bread structure. Without it, you could get a very dense loaf.

    How did you get your kids to eat this bread?

    I added maple syrup! Without it, they wouldn’t touch it. 😂

    Do I truly need all of this flour?

    You might not! That’s why we add flour incrementally in this recipe, so that we don’t run the risk of over-flouring our dough by adding it all at once.

    Without further delay, here is my Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread! I hope you love it as much as I do!


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    Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread

    This Maple Whole Wheat Sandwich Bread makes me reminisce about fall in Ann Arbor, Michigan.  It’s the perfect sandwich bread for this time of year!

    • Total Time: ~4 hours (with rising and proofing)

    Ingredients

    Units Scale
    • 582.5 g (2.33 cups) water
    • 1.5 tbsp instant yeast
    • 1/2 tbsp turbinado sugar
    • 384 g (3 cups) bread flour (ended up using close to 3 cups!!)
    • 452 g (4 cups) whole wheat flour
    • 1 tbsp salt
    • 2 tbsp vital wheat gluten
    • 156 g (1/2 cup) maple syrup
    • 1 large egg, for egg wash
    • 1 tsp water

    Instructions

    1. Warm water to 110°F-115°F.  Add instant yeast and turbinado sugar and stir to combine completely.  Allow yeast to proof for 8-10 minutes, or until it becomes foamy on top.  If yeast does not become foamy, then try again with new yeast.
    2. Add whole wheat flour and bread flour to a large bowl and combine with a whisk.
    3. Add yeast/water mixture, salt, Bob’s Red Mill vital wheat gluten, and about 4 cups of the flour mixture to a large mixing bowl (or the bowl of a stand mixer).  Use a wooden spoon or the flat beater of your stand mixer to mix on low speed until flour is completely combined.  The dough will be very loose and sticky at this point.
    4. If using a stand mixer, switch to the dough hook attachment.  If making by hand, you can continue using a wooden spoon, or switch to a Danish dough whisk at this point.
    5. Add flour mixture, 32 grams (1/4 cup) at a time, adding more once the previous addition is fully incorporated into the dough.  You might not need all of the flour mixture.  The dough is ready when it pulls away from the sides of the bowl and does not leave dough residue on the sides of the bowl.
    6. Turn the dough out onto a very lightly floured work surface and knead by hand for about two minutes before adding any additional flour.  The kneading process itself helps gluten development and sometimes you don’t need additional flour!  You can also continue kneading with a stand mixer, but I don’t recommend leaving the mixer at this point.
    7. If you use all of the flour mixture and the dough still hasn’t come away from the sides of the bowl, add additional bread flour, one tablespoon at a time, then knead by hand for at least a minute after each addition.  This dough should not need more than 3-5 tablespoons of additional flour.
    8. You’ll know the dough is done when it passes the windowpane test.  The dough should be tacky, but not sticky when it is done.
    9. Spray the mixing bowl with a light coat of nonstick spray.  Shape the dough into a ball and place into the mixing bowl.  Cover loosely and allow to rise in an area free of drafts for about 50-60 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size.  Alternately, you can check your dough by doing the finger poke test, which is my favorite way to test bread dough!
    10. Use a digital kitchen scale to separate the dough into two equal halves.  Use your fingers to shape the first half into a rough rectangle.  Fold the short end of the rectangle up 1/3 of the way and use the heel of your hand to seal the dough.  Fold the resulting triangular-shaped sides of the dough into the loaf and use the heel of your hand to seal.  Repeat this two more times, until you have a loaf shape.  Then, pinch the final seam and roll gently over the seam to form the final seal. (Confused about how to shape sandwich bread loaves?  Check out my video tutorial on YouTube!)
    11. Place the loaf into an 8.5″x4.5″ loaf pan, seam side down, and repeat step 10 with the second half of the dough.
    12. Allow the loaves to rise for another 35-45 minutes, or until the loaves are roughly 1” over the top of the loaf pans.
    13. During the final rise (proofing) time, preheat your oven to a true 400°F.  A long preheat time is essential to getting a beautiful loaf!  Also, during this time, add the egg and one teaspoon of water to a small bowl and scramble thoroughly.
    14. When the loaves are finished proofing, gently brush egg wash over both loaves.  Bake at 400°F for 20-25 minutes.  Loaves are done when they reach an internal temperature of 190°F, or when the loaves sound hollow when thumped on the bottom.
    15. Remove loaves from their pans immediately after baking and place on a cooling rack.
    16. Allow loaves to cool for at least 45 minutes before slicing.

    Notes

    1. You might not need all of the whole wheat flour/bread flour mixture for this recipe!  It will depend on a lot of factors!  You’ll know the dough is done kneading when it is tacky, but not sticky to the touch, and when it forms a very elastic dough ball.
    • Author: Shani
    • Prep Time: 25
    • Cook Time: 20
    • Category: Bread

    Keywords: Maple Whole Wheat Bread

    Oatmeal Sandwich Bread

    1

    It’s official! Back to school is here! And with this Oatmeal Sandwich Bread, back to school is going to be just a wee bit toothsome and tasty this year.

    Oatmeal Sandwich Bread picture (sliced)

    And who doesn’t like toothsome and tasty? I certainly do! And this Oatmeal Bread doesn’t disappoint!

    Why I’m Creating My Own Sandwich Bread

    My friends, the summer has been busy with…summering. So, lunches have been a bit non-traditional for the most part.

    BUT

    When I have endeavored to make lunches for everyone in the house (including the two dogs, who now eat lunch?), I’ve fallen into the convenience trap and just made sandwiches for everyone. Using store-bought sandwich bread.

    Well, I recently looked at the ingredients in my family’s favorite “natural” sandwich bread, and confirmed what I’ve known for a while. That I didn’t want my family eating store-bought sandwich bread anymore unless it was an absolute emergency. So, I dusted off a few of my own sandwich bread recipes and got to work. And I’m bringing these recipes to you now, in case you’re looking for a much more healthy alternative to the sandwich bread on store shelves.

    The Set Up for this Oatmeal Sandwich Bread

    This Oatmeal Sandwich Bread is incredibly easy to make, and, if you already make bread, you probably already have most (if not all) of the ingredients in your pantry!

    *Please note that this post contains affiliate links to the ingredients and products that I use in my own kitchen.*

    Oatmeal sandwich bread picture with twine

    Whole Milk: whole milk adds flavor, color, and protein to the dough. It’s also the liquid for this particular dough. You can also substitute oat milk, but there will be a distinctly oatmeal flavor to this bread if you do that, in addition to a slight nuttiness.

    Instant Yeast: instant yeast helps this dough to come together a little more quickly than active dry yeast. You can substitute active dry yeast, but you’ll have to extend the rise and proofing time by a few minutes. I exclusively use SAF Instant Yeast for sandwich bread.

    Turbinado Sugar: yeast is a living organism and it likes to eat sugar. So I give it a little turbinado sugar snack to help the initial proofing process.

    Bread Flour: I prefer bread flour in this recipe. The higher protein content of bread flour leads this loaf to be an incredibly beautiful, high-rising one. You can substitute all-purpose flour, but your bread will not rise as high. Also, depending on the protein content in your all-purpose flour, the texture might be noticeably softer. For this recipe, I used King Arthur Baking’s Bread Flour.

    Kosher Salt: salt is the major flavor driver in any bread. Without salt, bread is often left tasteless. I prefer kosher salt for bread, due to the larger granules. If using table salt, I recommend cutting the amount in half.

    Vital Wheat Glutenvital wheat gluten (also known as vital wheat gluten flour) is a high-gluten dough enhancer. Coming in at 80% protein, it’s an important ingredient for great crumb in sandwich loaves. You can absolutely omit vital wheat gluten if you wish; the outcome, however, will be a more dense loaf. I use Bob’s Red Mill for Vital Wheat Gluten.

    Whole Eggs: eggs are one of my favorite multi-tools for baking. The fatty egg yolk adds delicious flavor and texture to this bread, and the protein-rich egg white helps create the amazing structure.

    Old-Fashioned Oats: in this loaf, old-fashioned oats are responsible for the wonderful, toothsome texture. Plus, as a Mommy, knowing that my kiddos are getting something so healthy in the bread that they’re eating gives me extra peace of mind.

    Egg Wash: I use a whole egg for my sandwich bread egg wash. Egg wash creates an amazingly beautiful shine on sandwich bread, making it much, much more enticing!

    Oatmeal Sandwich Bread prep

    Beginners Start Here

    If you’re new to baking, or this is your first foray into bread, check out some of these BwB resources to help you become more confident with this Oatmeal Sandwich Bread!

    And, BONUS, I recently posted a video on the BwB YouTube channel about how to shape sandwich bread dough! You can check it out right here!

    These resources certainly aren’t mandatory for you to successfully make this bread, but they can help answer some burning bread questions for you!

    BREAD BOOTCAMP IS LIVE!

    Do you have lots and lots of questions about how to make incredible bread? Join us on September 17 and September 18 for BwB Bread Bootcamp! During this special, live, interactive event, your bread will be transformed from passable to predictably AMAZING!

    Click here for details! Purchase early for 10% off with code BREAD10!

    Frequently Asked Questions About Oatmeal Sandwich Bread

    How Long Will This Bread Last?

    This bread will last for about 48-72 hours at room temperature, depending on how it’s cut and stored. This recipe makes two loaves, so I recommend freezing one so that you can have bread for the whole work week!

    What’s the best way to store this bread?

    Cut from the center! Start slicing bread in the center, then smush (*this is a technical term*) the two ends together and wrap tightly with saran/cling wrap. The longer the bread ends stay intact, the longer you’ll have fresh bread!

    Can I make this bread without vital wheat gluten?

    Absolutely! The vital wheat gluten aids with rise and texture. But it’s not mandatory. It does help if you’re trying to get that gorgeous sandwich bread texture, and it helps create a bread that has more structure. Without it, the bread will not rise as high, and it will be less airy.

    Do you have any other sandwich bread recipes?

    Absolutely! Currently, there is a Classic Sandwich Bread recipe on my site. There are three others coming very soon!

    How did you get your kiddos to eat Oatmeal Bread?

    I took the oatmeal garnish off of the top and they LOVED it. 😂

    Each sandwich bread in my repertoire has a very special place in my heart. This one, Friends, is an incredible bread and I hope you love it! Onto the recipe!

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    Oatmeal Sandwich Bread

    This delightful Oatmeal Sandwich Bread will make you never want to buy bread from a store ever again!  It pleases children and adults alike and is wonderful for ALL the lunchtime sandwiches coming up in the fall months.

    Ingredients

    Units Scale
    • 250 g (1 c) plus 2 tbsp whole milk
    • 1.5 tbsp instant yeast
    • 3 tsp turbinado sugar
    • 160 g (2 c) old-fashioned oats, ground, plus two tablespoons for garnish (optional)
    • 640 g (5 c) bread flour
    • 1 tbsp kosher salt
    • 2 tbsp vital wheat gluten

    3 eggs, divided (2 for dough and one for egg wash)

    Instructions

    1. Warm milk to 110°F-115°F.  Add instant yeast and turbinado sugar and stir to combine completely.  Allow yeast to proof for 8-10 minutes, or until it becomes foamy on top.  If yeast does not become foamy, then try again with new yeast.
    2. Use a food processor or spice grinder to pulse the 160 grams of old-fashioned oats to desired consistency.  Because I make this for my children, I pulverize the oats, but you can leave some intact for an even more deliciously toothsome bread.  Add pulverized oatmeal to bread flour and whisk to combine.
    3. Add yeast/milk mixture, salt, vital wheat gluten, two eggs, and 512 grams (about 4 cups) of the oatmeal/flour to a large mixing bowl (or the bowl of a stand mixer).  Use a wooden spoon or the flat beater of your stand mixer to mix on low speed until flour is completely combined.  The dough will be very loose and sticky at this point.
    4. If using a stand mixer, switch to the dough hook attachment.  If making by hand, you can continue using a wooden spoon, or switch to a Danish dough whisk at this point.
    5. Add flour/oatmeal mixture, 32 grams (1/4 cup) at a time, adding more once the previous addition is fully incorporated into the dough.  
    6. Once all of the flour/oatmeal mixture is incorporated and the dough is in the shape of a rough ball, turn the dough out onto a very lightly floured work surface and knead by hand for about two minutes before adding any additional flour.  The kneading process itself helps gluten development and sometimes you don’t need additional flour!  You can also continue kneading with a stand mixer, but I don’t recommend leaving the mixer 
    7. If necessary, add bread flour, one tablespoon at a time, then knead by hand for at least a minute after each addition.  This dough should not need more than 3-5 tablespoons of additional flour.
    8. You’ll know the dough is done when it passes the windowpane test.  The dough should be tacky, but not sticky when it is done.
    9. Spray the mixing bowl with a light coat of nonstick spray.  Shape the dough into a ball and place into the mixing bowl.  Cover loosely and allow to rise in an area free of drafts for about an hour, or until the dough has doubled in size.  Alternately, you can check your dough by doing the finger poke test, which is my favorite way to test bread dough!
    10. Use a digital kitchen scale to separate the dough into two equal halves.  Use your fingers to shape the first half into a rough rectangle.  Fold the short end of the rectangle up 1/3 of the way and use the heel of your hand to seal the dough.  Fold the resulting triangular-shaped sides of the dough into the loaf and use the heel of your hand to seal.  Repeat this two more times, until you have a loaf shape.  Then, pinch the final seam and roll gently over the seam to form the final seal. (Confused about how to shape sandwich bread loaves?  Check out my video tutorial on YouTube!)
    11. Prepare a 9”x5” loaf pan by lightly spraying it with cooking spray or lining the whole pan with parchment paper (including the sides).  Place the loaf into the loaf pan, seam side down, and repeat step 9 with the second half of the dough.
    12. Allow the loaves to rise for another 50 minutes, or until the loaves are roughly 1” over the top of the loaf pans.
    13. During the final rise (proofing) time, preheat your oven to a true 400°F.  A long preheat time is essential to getting a beautiful loaf!  Also, during this time, add the last egg and one teaspoon of water to a small bowl and scramble thoroughly.
    14. When the loaves are finished proofing, gently brush egg wash over both loaves.  Sprinkle the remaining oatmeal on top of the loaves.  Bake at 400°F for 20-25 minutes.  Loaves are done when they reach an internal temperature of 190°F, or when the loaves sound hollow when thumped on the bottom.
    15. Remove loaves from their pans immediately after baking and place on a cooling rack.
    16. Allow loaves to cool for at least 45 minutes before slicing.
    1. Allow loaves to cool completely before freezing for storage.

    Notes

    • This bread can last in the freezer for up to a month.
    • This bread is best eaten within 48 hours of making it, if it’s left out at room temperature.
    • Plastic wrap is great for bread storage, and will give you another day of freshness if used properly.
    • Author: Shani

    Thanks for joining me for Part 2 of the bread series, my friends! See you next time!

    BREAD BOOTCAMP IS LIVE!

    Do you have lots and lots of questions about how to make incredible bread? Join us on September 17 and September 18 for BwB Bread Bootcamp! During this special, live, interactive event, your bread will be transformed from passable to predictably AMAZING!

    Click here for details! Purchase early for 10% off with code BREAD10!

    Check us out on Instagram!

    Join the List

    Subscribe to get the Five Tips for Amazing Cakes freebie and our latest content by email!

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      My Classic Sandwich Bread

      0

      Friends, this summer has been an absolute dream. I’ve spent so much time with my family, had an incredible vacation, and smiled until my cheeks and head hurt. But reality is upon me now, and that means it’s time for back to school! With a third grader and a sixth grader who are very *ahem* secure about their food likes and dislikes, back to school means lots of sandwiches. And lots of sandwiches for them means lots of sandwich bread for me.

      Classic sandwich bread photo

      So…welcome to my sandwich bread series! In this series, you’ll learn the four types of sandwich bread that I make for my family. And today, we’re starting with my classic sandwich bread.

      This recipe is for a classic white sandwich bread, and, while it does take practice to master, it is so worth the learning curve! The recipe makes two loaves, which is just about enough for a full week of kid sandwiches in my house.

      Because did I mention there are lots of sandwiches around this time of year?

      The Set Up for Classic Sandwich Bread

      To make this sandwich bread, you need just a few ingredients!

      *Please note that this post contains affiliate links to the ingredients and products that I use in my own kitchen.*

      Ingredients: In the measuring cup: whole milk, yeast, and turbinado sugar. In the bowl: bread flour, salt, and vital wheat gluten. Not pictured: one egg for egg wash.

      Whole Milk: whole milk adds flavor, color, and protein to the dough. It’s also the liquid for this particular dough.

      Instant Yeast: instant yeast helps this dough to come together a little more quickly than active dry yeast. You can substitute active dry yeast, but you’ll have to extend the rise and proofing time by a few minutes. I exclusively use SAF Instant Yeast for sandwich bread.

      Turbinado Sugar: yeast is a living organism and it likes to eat sugar. So I give it a little turbinado sugar snack to help the initial proofing process.

      Bread Flour: I prefer bread flour in this recipe, due to the higher protein content. You can substitute all-purpose flour, but your bread will not rise as high. Also, depending on the protein content in your all-purpose flour, the texture might be noticeably softer. For this recipe, I used King Arthur Baking’s Bread Flour.

      Kosher Salt: salt is the major flavor driver in any bread. Without salt, bread is often left tasteless. I prefer kosher salt for bread, due to the larger granules. If using table salt, cut the amount in half.

      Vital Wheat Gluten: vital wheat gluten (also known as vital wheat gluten flour) is a high-gluten dough enhancer. Coming in at 80% protein, it’s an important ingredient for great crumb in sandwich loaves. You can absolutely omit vital wheat gluten if you wish; the outcome, however, will be a more dense loaf. I use Bob’s Red Mill for Vital Wheat Gluten.

      Egg Wash: I use a whole egg for my sandwich bread egg wash. Egg wash creates an amazingly beautiful shine on sandwich bread, making it much, much more enticing!

      Beginners Start Here

      If you’re new to baking, or this is your first foray into bread, check out some of these BwB resources to help you become more confident with this classic sandwich bread!

      And, BONUS, I recently posted a video on the BwB YouTube channel about how to shape sandwich bread dough! You can check it out right here!

      These resources aren’t mandatory, but they can help answer some burning bread questions for you!

      BREAD BOOTCAMP IS LIVE!

      Do you have lots and lots of questions about how to make incredible bread? Join us on September 17 and September 18 for BwB Bread Bootcamp! During this special, live, interactive event, your bread will be transformed from passable to predictably AMAZING!

      Click here for details! Purchase early for 10% off with code BREAD10!

      I’m so excited about this sandwich bread series! My kids are not much for bento box lunches, so when they don’t have hot lunch through their school program, I can feed them this bread and know exactly what’s in it.

      And for this mom, that’s a big win.

      Enjoy the recipe, friends!

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      My Classic Sandwich Bread

      This classic white sandwich bread has just a few ingredients, and it tastes better than anything store-bought!

      Ingredients

      Units Scale
      • 532 g whole milk (2 cups plus 2 tbsp)
      • 1 tbsp instant yeast
      • 1/2 tbsp turbinado sugar
      • 704 g (5.5 c) Bread Flour, divided
      • 1 tbsp salt
      • 1.5 tbsp vital wheat gluten
      • 1 large egg, for egg wash
      • 1 tsp water

      Instructions

      1. Warm milk to 110°F-115°F.  Add instant yeast and turbinado sugar and stir to combine completely.  Allow yeast to proof for 8-10 minutes, or until it becomes foamy on top.  If yeast does not become foamy, then try again with new yeast.
      2. Add yeast/milk mixture, salt, vital wheat gluten, and 480 grams (3.75 cups) of bread flour to a large mixing bowl (or the bowl of a stand mixer).  Use a wooden spoon or the flat beater of your stand mixer to mix on low speed until flour is completely combined.  The dough will be very loose and sticky at this point.
      3. If using a stand mixer, switch to the dough hook attachment.  If making by hand, you can continue using a wooden spoon, or switch to a Danish dough whisk at this point.
      4. Add flour, 32 grams (1/4 cup) at a time, adding more flour once the previous addition is fully incorporated into the dough.  
      5. Once all of the flour is incorporated and the dough is in the shape of a rough ball, turn the dough out onto a very lightly floured work surface and knead by hand for about two minutes before adding any additional flour.  The kneading process itself helps gluten development and sometimes you don’t need additional flour!  You can also continue kneading with a stand mixer, but I don’t recommend leaving the mixer 
      6. If necessary, add flour, one tablespoon at a time, then knead by hand for at least a minute after each addition.  This dough should not need more than 3-5 tablespoons of additional flour.
      7. You’ll know the dough is done when it passes the windowpane test.  The dough should be tacky, but not sticky when it is done.
      8. Spray the mixing bowl with a light coat of nonstick spray.  Shape the dough into a ball and place into the mixing bowl.  Cover loosely and allow to rise in an area free of drafts for about 45 minutes, or until the dough has doubled in size.  Alternately, you can check your dough by doing the finger poke test, which is my favorite way to test bread dough!
      9. Use a digital kitchen scale to separate the dough into two equal halves.  Use your fingers to shape the first half into a rough rectangle.  Fold the short end of the rectangle up 1/3 of the way and use the heel of your hand to seal the dough.  Fold the resulting triangular-shaped sides of the dough into the loaf and use the heel of your hand to seal.  Repeat this two more times, until you have a loaf shape.  Then, pinch the final seam and roll gently over the seam to form the final seal. (Confused about how to shape sandwich bread loaves?  Click here for a video tutorial!)
      10. Place the loaf into an 8.5”x4.5” loaf pan, seam side down, and repeat step 9 with the second half of the dough.
      11. Allow the loaves to rise for another 45 minutes, or until the loaves are roughly 1” over the top of the loaf pans.
      12. During the final rise (proofing) time, preheat your oven to a true 400°F.  A long preheat time is essential to getting a beautiful loaf!  Also, during this time, add the egg and one teaspoon of water to a small bowl and scramble thoroughly.
      13. When the loaves are finished proofing, gently brush egg wash over both loaves.  Bake at 400°F for 18-25 minutes.  Loaves are done when they reach an internal temperature of 190°F, or when the loaves sound hollow when thumped on the bottom.
      14. Allow loaves to cool for at least 45 minutes before slicing.
      15. Allow loaves to cool completely before freezing for storage.

      Notes

      • This bread can last in the freezer for up to a month.
      • This bread is best eaten within 48 hours of making it, if it’s left out at room temperature.
      • Plastic wrap is great for bread storage, and will give you another day of freshness if used properly.
      • Author: Shani

      See you next time!

      Can’t wait for the next installment of the sandwich bread series? Don’t forget to sign up for the email list so that you can be among the first in the know!

      Join the List

      Subscribe to get the Five Tips for Amazing Cakes freebie and our latest content by email!

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